Charged Particle Reflection by a Planar Artificially Structured Boundary With Electrostatic Plugging

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This article uses a classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation to investigate an artificially structured boundary for confinement and control of charged particles.

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11 p.

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Hedlof, R. M. & Ordonez, Carlos A. November 30, 2017.

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This article uses a classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation to investigate an artificially structured boundary for confinement and control of charged particles.

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11 p.

Notes

Abstract: A classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation is used to investigate an artificially
structured boundary for confinement and control of charged particles. The artificially
structured boundary considered here incorporates a planar sequence of conducting
wires, where adjacent wires carry current in opposite directions. Such a configuration
creates a sequence of magnetic cusps and was studied previously [C. A.
Ordonez, J. Appl. Phys. 106, 024905 (2009)]. The effect of introducing a sequence
of electrodes for electrostatic plugging of the cusps is investigated. The results of the
simulations are used to identify regions of parameter space in which particle losses
through the cusps may be negligible in the single particle limit. A trap based on a
cylindrical generalization of the artificially structured boundary presented here may
lead to a method for confining non-neutral and partially neutralized plasmas along
the edge, such that the bulk of a confined plasma is effectively free of externally
applied electromagnetic fields.

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  • AIP Advances, 2017. College Park, MD: American Institute of Physics

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  • Publication Title: AIP Advances
  • Volume: 7
  • Page Start: 1
  • Page End: 11
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

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  • November 30, 2017

Submitted Date

  • October 9, 2017

Accepted Date

  • November 17, 2017

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • March 15, 2019, 11:51 a.m.

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Hedlof, R. M. & Ordonez, Carlos A. Charged Particle Reflection by a Planar Artificially Structured Boundary With Electrostatic Plugging, article, November 30, 2017; College Park, Maryland. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1459151/: accessed March 21, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.