Modelling and Experimental Studies of the Effect of Water at the Polymer-Filler Interface in Silica-Filled Siloxane Rubbers

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Silica-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite systems find a broad range of applications due to their chemical and environmental resilience and the ability to fine tune, through chemical and processing modifications, the chemical and mechanical properties resulting in a precise engineering property for the final component. Thus, requirements for, and life-performance predictions of, these materials require an understanding of the interaction between the silica filler and the polymer network. Because silica surfaces are well known to have a high affinity for water adsorption, and this water is a critical part of the interface between the silica particles and the polymer matrix, water ... continued below

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Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Balazs, G B; Gee, R & Maxwell, R S August 23, 2004.

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Silica-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite systems find a broad range of applications due to their chemical and environmental resilience and the ability to fine tune, through chemical and processing modifications, the chemical and mechanical properties resulting in a precise engineering property for the final component. Thus, requirements for, and life-performance predictions of, these materials require an understanding of the interaction between the silica filler and the polymer network. Because silica surfaces are well known to have a high affinity for water adsorption, and this water is a critical part of the interface between the silica particles and the polymer matrix, water at this interface has important consequences on the nature of the silica-polymer bonding and subsequently the mechanical behaviour. Previous studies have reported on the water speciation and long-term outgassing kinetics of common fumed and precipitated silicas used in silicone elastomers, and of one such copolymer system in particular. Several different water species were observed to be present with a range of desorption activation energies. The amount and type of species present were observed to be dependent on the thermal and chemical history of the filler and the composite. Solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methods based on quantification of residual magnetic dipolar couplings have also been applied, as these measurements have been shown to be quite sensitive to dynamic and morphological changes in elastomer systems. These residual dipolar couplings in elastomeric materials arise due to polymer network constraints (on the NMR timescale) that prevent the averaging, due to reorientations, of the homonuclear dipolar couplings to zero. Residual dipolar couplings, as a result, can be used to test theories of elasticity, gelation, and polymer conformation. In addition, Molecular Dynamics (MD) investigations have found that the removal of water from the polymer-filler interface has a significant effect on the polymer motional dynamics.

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PDF-file: 8 pages; size: 0.2 Mbytes

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  • Presented at: Filler Reinforcement of Rubber, London, United Kingdom, Sep 14 - Sep 14, 2004

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  • Report No.: UCRL-CONF-206202
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 15014576
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1411995

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  • August 23, 2004

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  • Jan. 23, 2019, 12:54 p.m.

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  • Jan. 29, 2019, 11:40 a.m.

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Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Balazs, G B; Gee, R & Maxwell, R S. Modelling and Experimental Studies of the Effect of Water at the Polymer-Filler Interface in Silica-Filled Siloxane Rubbers, article, August 23, 2004; Livermore, California. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1411995/: accessed March 20, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.