Rapid isothermal annealing of As-, P-, and B-implanted silicon

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This article discusses rapid idothermal annealing of As-, P-, and B-implanted silicon.

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9 p.

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Wilson, Scott R.; Paulson, W. M.; Gregory, R. B.; Hamdi, A. H. & McDaniel, Floyd Del. (Floyd Delbert), 1942- June 15, 1984.

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This article discusses rapid idothermal annealing of As-, P-, and B-implanted silicon.

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9 p.

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Copyright 1984 American Institute of Physics. J. Appl. Phys. 55(12). 15 June 1984. http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.333034

Abstract: Single-crystal silicon wafers have been implanted with As, P, and B to doses of 1x1013–1x1016/cm2 and given a transient anneal using a Varian IA-200 Rapid Isothermal Annealer. The system uses infrared radiation to heat the wafers to temperatures in excess of 1000 °C for times on the order of 10 sec. Sheet resistance and Hall measurements have been used to determine the effect of the anneal on the electrical properties of the wafers. Rutherford backscattering and secondary ion mass spectroscopy have been used to measure lattice damage and dopant profiles before and after annealing. As and P are lost during the anneal unless the wafer is capped. Complete activation can be achieved with very little dopant diffusion. Residual damage is minimal in (100) oriented wafers that had been implanted with As. However, for (111) wafers damage is less in (111) wafers implanted to doses ≤5.0x1015/cm2. The diffusion of As during this transient anneal has been modeled using a concentration enhanced diffusion coefficient and the wafer temperature profile obtained from an optical pyrometer.

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  • Journal of Applied Physics, 1984, College Park: American Institute of Physics, pp. 4162-4170

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  • Publication Title: Journal of Applied Physics
  • Volume: 55
  • Issue: 12
  • Page Start: 4162
  • Page End: 4170
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • June 15, 1984

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  • Feb. 1, 2013, 9:58 a.m.

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  • April 1, 2014, 3:13 p.m.

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Wilson, Scott R.; Paulson, W. M.; Gregory, R. B.; Hamdi, A. H. & McDaniel, Floyd Del. (Floyd Delbert), 1942-. Rapid isothermal annealing of As-, P-, and B-implanted silicon, article, June 15, 1984; [College Park, Maryland]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc139472/: accessed October 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.