Lessons from Extreme metal musicians: a perspective from Singapore

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This paper revisits epistemological foundations of in/formal learning through music by making observations about songs and lessons learnt when studying an approach to music learning the practice of Extreme metal music.

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25 p.

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Dairianathan, Eugene July 2009.

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This paper is part of the collection entitled: International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education (ISSME) and was provided by UNT College of Music to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this paper can be viewed below.

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This paper revisits epistemological foundations of in/formal learning through music by making observations about songs and lessons learnt when studying an approach to music learning the practice of Extreme metal music.

Physical Description

25 p.

Notes

Abstract: Despite the processes of learning by popular musicians at a very personal level, there is very
little common knowledge or recognition of how popular musicians in general learn or of the
attitudes and values they share in relation to music learning. A serious examination of popular
music learning practices could provide insights for teaching and learning of popular music as
well as to provide lessons in music. Having begun initial studies of a local Extreme Metal
group, Rudra, I study two of their songs, ‘Malediction’ (released in 1995) and ‘Ageless
Conciousness I Am’ (released in 2005). While ‘Malediction’ revealed the presence of written
exiguous notation Rudra members relied on for their recording, the final recording of
‘Ageless Consciousness I Am’ revealed two earlier sound recordings. Rudra’s exiguous
notational system was later supplanted by their reliance from 2000 onwards on recorded
sound files as notational systems but accrued significant benefits for the band in the early
stages of their learning. By making observations about their songs and lessons learnt when
studying an approach to music learning in the practice of Extreme metal music, I revisit
epistemological foundations of in/formal learning through music.

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  • International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education, July 5-9, 2009. Limerick, Ireland.

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  • Publication Title: Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education

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International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education (ISSME)

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  • July 2009

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  • Nov. 28, 2018, 5:21 p.m.

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Dairianathan, Eugene. Lessons from Extreme metal musicians: a perspective from Singapore, paper, July 2009; Dublin, Ireland. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1390624/: accessed December 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Music.