‘I drum, therefore I am’? Thoughts on an integrated model of identity and learning: preliminary findings from on-going research by a doctoral student

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

This paper presents ongoing research to examine drummers' identities and learning processes.

Physical Description

36 p.

Creation Information

Smith, Gareth Dylan July 2009.

Context

This paper is part of the collection entitled: International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education (ISSME) and was provided by UNT College of Music to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this paper can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this paper or its content.

Author

Publisher

Provided By

UNT College of Music

The nation's largest comprehensive music school, the UNT College of Music provides a dynamic learning environment for both future professionals and the broader university community. The college offers fully accredited degrees from bachelor to doctoral levels, and its faculty includes internationally acclaimed artists and scholars. More than 1200 concerts and recitals are presented annually.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this paper. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

This paper presents ongoing research to examine drummers' identities and learning processes.

Physical Description

36 p.

Notes

Abstract:Drummers are under-represented in the research literature, and are frequently misunderstood;
books and web sites are dedicated to ‘drummer jokes’, and perhaps the world’s best-known
drummer is one of Jim Henson’s Muppets. So who are these people? What and how do they
learn? Identities and music education are closely linked, for, as Green has noted, ‘identity…
(is) ‘intrinsically and unavoidably connected to particular ways of learning’ (Green, 2002:
216). Drummers’ identities and learning are explored and explained using a new model of the
Snowball Self. Increasingly, drummers are finding their teaching and learning legitimized by
the educational establishment. Formal and informal learning are discussed, including use of
the internet as an educational resource; the internet can of course also be a vital tool in
identity realization. The paper presents ongoing research from a PhD student at the University
of London. The study is from an emic perspective as the researcher is a drummer and drum kit
teacher. Data have been collected from semi-structured interviews, observations and
questionnaires with two groups of participants – teenage drummers, and professional
drummers over the age of thirty. It is hoped that this work-in-progress will interest music
education practitioners as well as music education sociologists.

Source

  • International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education, July 5-9, 2009. Limerick, Ireland.

Language

Item Type

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education

Collections

This paper is part of the following collection of related materials.

International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education (ISSME)

What responsibilities do I have when using this paper?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this paper.

Creation Date

  • July 2009

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 28, 2018, 5:21 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this paper last used?

Congratulations! It looks like you are the first person to view this item online.

Interact With This Paper

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Smith, Gareth Dylan. ‘I drum, therefore I am’? Thoughts on an integrated model of identity and learning: preliminary findings from on-going research by a doctoral student, paper, July 2009; Dublin, Ireland. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1390622/: accessed December 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Music.