Oh Say, You Can’t Sing: The ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ and the National Anthem Project in Wartime America

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

This paper examines the place of 'The Star-Spangled Banner' in U.S. musical culture.

Physical Description

28 p.

Creation Information

Russell, Melinda July 2009.

Context

This paper is part of the collection entitled: International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education (ISSME) and was provided by UNT College of Music to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this paper can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this paper or its content.

Author

Publisher

Provided By

UNT College of Music

The nation's largest comprehensive music school, the UNT College of Music provides a dynamic learning environment for both future professionals and the broader university community. The college offers fully accredited degrees from bachelor to doctoral levels, and its faculty includes internationally acclaimed artists and scholars. More than 1200 concerts and recitals are presented annually.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this paper. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

This paper examines the place of 'The Star-Spangled Banner' in U.S. musical culture.

Physical Description

28 p.

Notes

Abstract: I examine the place of ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ in U.S. musical culture, with special
attention to the National Anthem Project, launched in 2005 by the National Association for
Music Education (MENC) to ‘restore America's voice.’ Claiming that ‘nearly 2 in 3
Americans don't know all the words to the 'Star Spangled Banner,'‘ MENC officials began a
multifaceted mission to ensure familiarity with and performance of the anthem. Further, they
argued that school music education was key to the problem and to the solution, engaging
music educators in an explicitly patriotic enterprise just as the country was becoming divided
about the Iraq war. ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ has had a controversial history. Numerous
attempts have been made to legislate aspects of its use, from replacing it, to mandating its
language or key. The song is criticized for its arcane language, its focus on the war and the
flag (rather than on the country or its citizens), and especially for its musical difficulty. I
investigate the underlying assertions of the National Anthem Project: that Americans don't
know the anthem, that this lack of knowledge is a recent phenomenon, and that it can be
traced to music education in the public schools.

Source

  • International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education, July 5-9, 2009. Limerick, Ireland.

Language

Item Type

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education

Collections

This paper is part of the following collection of related materials.

International Symposium on the Sociology of Music Education (ISSME)

What responsibilities do I have when using this paper?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this paper.

Creation Date

  • July 2009

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 28, 2018, 5:21 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this paper last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 1
Total Uses: 1

Interact With This Paper

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Russell, Melinda. Oh Say, You Can’t Sing: The ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ and the National Anthem Project in Wartime America, paper, July 2009; Dublin, Ireland. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1390614/: accessed December 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Music.