Changing lenses to assess biodiversity: patterns of species richness in sub-Antarctic plants and implications for global conservation Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title Changing lenses to assess biodiversity: patterns of species richness in sub-Antarctic plants and implications for global conservation

Creator

  • Author: Rozzi, Ricardo, 1960-
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of North Texas; Universidad de Magallanes; Universidad de Chile
  • Author: Armesto, Juan J., 1953-
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: Universidad de Chile; Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
  • Author: Goffinet, Bernard
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of Connecticut
  • Author: Buck, William R., 1950-
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: New York Botanical Garden
  • Author: Massardo, Francisca
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: Universidad de Magallanes; Universidad de Chile
  • Author: Silander, John August, 1945-
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of Connecticut
  • Author: Kalin Arroyo, Mary T.
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: Universidad de Chile
  • Author: Russell, Shaun
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of Wales
  • Author: Anderson, Christopher B.
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: Universidad de Magallanes; Universidad de Chile
  • Author: Cavieres, Lohengrin A.
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: Universidad de Chile; Universidad de Concepción
  • Author: Callicott, J. Baird
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of North Texas

Publisher

  • Name: Ecological Society of America
    Place of Publication: [Washington, D.C.]

Date

  • Creation: 2008

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: Article discussing patterns of species richness in sub-Antarctic plants and implications for global conservation.
  • Physical Description: 7 p.

Subject

  • Keyword: biodiversity
  • Keyword: sub-Antarctic plants
  • Keyword: conservation
  • Keyword: ecology

Source

  • Journal: Frontiers in Ecology, 2008, Washington D.C.: Ecological Society of America

Citation

  • Publication Title: Frontiers in Ecology
  • Volume: 6
  • Issue: 3
  • Page Start: 131
  • Page End: 137
  • Peer Reviewed: True

Collection

  • Name: UNT Scholarly Works
    Code: UNTSW

Institution

  • Name: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
    Code: UNTCAS

Rights

  • Rights Access: public

Resource Type

  • Article

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • DOI: 10.1890/070020
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc130194

Degree

  • Academic Department: Philosophy and Religion Studies

Note

  • Display Note: Abstract: Taxonomic groups and ecoregions shape the "lenses" through which biodiversity is assessed and conserved. A historical bias toward vertebrates and vascular plants in the northern hemisphere underpins how global patterns of biodiversity in terrestrial ecosystems are perceived. Here, the authors focus on the hitherto overlooked non-vascular flora (liverworts and mosses) in the remote sub-Antarctic Magellanic ecoregion of southwestern South America. The authors report that: (1) this ecoregion hosts outstanding non-vascular floristic richness, with > 5% of the world's bryophytes on < 0.01% of the Earth's land surface; (2) species richness patterns for vascular and non-vascular plants are inverted across 25 degrees of latitude in Chile; and (3) while vascular plants are 20 times more abundant than non-vascular plants globally and in tropical South America, non-vascular plants are dominant in the sub-Antarctic Magellanic ecoregion and Antarctic Peninsula. These findings have been translated into policy and conservation decisions, including the creation of the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve in 2005 and the introduction there of "tourism with a hand lens" in the diverse "miniature forests" of bryophytes, lichens, and invertebrates. The authors argue for consideration of ecoregional- or biome -specific indicator groups, rather than a narrow set of global indicator groups, for designing effective conservation strategies.