Cause-Related versus Non-Cause-Related Sport Events: Differentiating Endurance Events Through a Comparison of Athletes' Motives

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This article compares the motives of athletes to participate in cause-related or non-cause-related sport events.

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10 p.

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Rundio, Amy; Heere, Bob & Newland, Brianna 2014.

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  • © 2014, West Virginia University

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This article compares the motives of athletes to participate in cause-related or non-cause-related sport events.

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10 p.

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Abstract: In the crowded sport event market, differentiation strategy is key to the survival of event organizers. One way to differentiate an event is by adding a charity component. To understand how events attract athletes, this study compared the motives of athletes to participate in cause-related or non-cause-related sport events. Using the Motivations of Marathoners Scales (MOMS), participants rated motivations to attend either cause-related sport events or non-cause-related sport events. The five motivations important for all participants were General Health Orientation, Personal Goal Achievement, Weight Concern, Self-Esteem, and Affiliation motivations. Association with cause-related sport events attracted participants more for Self- Esteem, Recognition/Approval, Personal Goal Achievement, and Competition reasons. Non-cause-related events attracted participants more motivated by the Weight Concern motive. Overall, the psychographic differences for participating in either cause-related or non-cause-related events supported the view that adding a charity component to an event can add to the differentiation strategy of the organization.

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  • Sport Marketing Quarterly, 2014. Morgantown, WV: FiT Publishing

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  • Publication Title: Sport Marketing Quarterly
  • Volume: 23
  • Issue: 1
  • Page Start: 17
  • Page End: 26
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • 2014

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  • Sept. 24, 2018, 1:56 p.m.

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Rundio, Amy; Heere, Bob & Newland, Brianna. Cause-Related versus Non-Cause-Related Sport Events: Differentiating Endurance Events Through a Comparison of Athletes' Motives, article, 2014; Morgantown, West Virginia. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1248371/: accessed January 15, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Business.