Consumers from Emerging Markets: Perceptions and Attitudes Toward Global Sporting Brands

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This article examines how the transition from emerging market to consumer market has affected consumer perceptions on global sport apparel brands.

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14 p.

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Kim, Chiyoung & Heere, Bob 2012.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Business to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • © 2012, West Virginia University

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Description

This article examines how the transition from emerging market to consumer market has affected consumer perceptions on global sport apparel brands.

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14 p.

Notes

Abstract: While consumers within emerging markets are the largest growth market for global sport apparel brands,
relatively little is known about how they perceive these brands. These emerging markets have recently
become consumer markets for Western brands, yet they initially served as producing nations. This study
examined how this transition affected consumer perceptions on global sport apparel brands. Consumer
behavior theories, such as the brand as “Western status symbol,” ethnocentrism, the country of origin
effect, and the country of manufacturing effect were all incorporated within this exploration. Fifteen interviews
were held with young adult consumers from both India and China. In contrast to previous studies,
we suggest that these respondents view Western sport apparel brands favorably because they are seen as an
instrument to express a global citizenship. Additionally, the international labor practices did not seem to
directly harm the global brands, but they did diminish some of the utilitarian advantages the Western
brands possessed.

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  • Sport Marketing Quarterly, 2012. Morgantown, WV: FiT Publishing

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  • Publication Title: Sport Marketing Quarterly
  • Volume: 21
  • Issue: 1
  • Page Start: 19
  • Page End: 31
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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  • 2012

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  • Sept. 24, 2018, 1:56 p.m.

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Kim, Chiyoung & Heere, Bob. Consumers from Emerging Markets: Perceptions and Attitudes Toward Global Sporting Brands, article, 2012; Morgantown, West Virginia. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1248349/: accessed January 19, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Business.