The South Africa World Cup: The Ability of Small and Medium Firms to Profit From Increased Tourism Surrounding Mega-Events

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This article examines how a mega-sport event affects small and medium businesses (SMEs) that hope to profit from the increased tourism associated with the event.

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14 p.

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Heere, Bob; Van Der Manden, Pieter & Van Hemert, Patricia March 2, 2015.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Business to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 15 times , with 6 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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This article examines how a mega-sport event affects small and medium businesses (SMEs) that hope to profit from the increased tourism associated with the event.

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14 p.

Notes

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to implement a microeconomic lens to examine how a mega-sport event affects small and medium businesses (SMEs) that hope to profit from the increased tourism associated with the event. Guided by stakeholder theory, local SME owners were interviewed before and after the World Cup. Respondents suggested that the opportunities to take advantage of the World Cup were limited for SMEs because: a) limited or no access to the event and associated tourists, b) lack of knowledge and expertise to take advantage of opportunities, and c) the priority the organizing committee gives to other stakeholders, such as sponsors and the FIFA. Due to these constraints, SMEs were not able to build lasting partnerships through the World Cup, nor were they able to make any profit from the event.

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  • Tourism Analysis, 2015. Putnam Valley, NY: Cognizant Communication Corporation.

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  • Publication Title: Tourism Analysis
  • Volume: 20
  • Issue: 1
  • Page Start: 39
  • Page End: 52
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

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  • March 2, 2015

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  • Sept. 24, 2018, 1:56 p.m.

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Heere, Bob; Van Der Manden, Pieter & Van Hemert, Patricia. The South Africa World Cup: The Ability of Small and Medium Firms to Profit From Increased Tourism Surrounding Mega-Events, article, March 2, 2015; Putnam Valley, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1248347/: accessed December 12, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Business.