Can Regular and Special Education be Integrated into One System? Political Culture Theory May Have the Answer

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This paper examines proposals to integrate regular and special education.

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31 p.

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Pazey, Barbara L. October 1993.

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Description

This paper examines proposals to integrate regular and special education.

Physical Description

31 p.

Notes

Abstract: This paper examines proposals to integrate regular
and special education. It offers an overview of pertinent regular and
special education-reform efforts, discusses recommendation for
unified schools that include all students, and reviews literature on
political culture theory. Elazar's (1966) theory of political culture
is used as a framework for analyzing the potential micro- and
macro-political effects of creating a unified education system. A
conclusion is that throughout the 1980s, the reform of regular
education centered on quality and excellence, whereas
special-education reform advocated equity through efficient order.
The unanswered question of the 1990s appears to be "Are both
excellence and equity possible in the schools?" This poses dilemmas
of control versus democracy and equity versus excellence.
Recommendations for creating a unified school system include
promoting dialogue among all stakeholders, understanding political
cultures, and carefully examining the underlying values of the
current educational system.

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  • Annual Meeting of the University Council for Educational Administration. October 29-31, 1993. Houston, Texas.

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  • October 1993

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 8, 2018, 8:27 a.m.

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Pazey, Barbara L. Can Regular and Special Education be Integrated into One System? Political Culture Theory May Have the Answer, paper, October 1993; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1225776/: accessed November 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Education.