Hyperbolic metamaterials: new physics behind a classical problem

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

This article summarizes earlier theories in the Clemmow's prescription for transformation of the electromagnetic field in hyperbolic media and provides a review of recent developments in this active research area.

Physical Description

17 p.

Creation Information

Drachev, Vladimir P.; Podolskiy, Viktor A. & Kildishev, Alexander V. June 17, 2013.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Arts and Sciences to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Publisher

Provided By

UNT College of Arts and Sciences

The UNT College of Arts and Sciences educates students in traditional liberal arts, performing arts, sciences, professional, and technical academic programs. In addition to its departments, the college includes academic centers, institutes, programs, and offices providing diverse courses of study.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

This article summarizes earlier theories in the Clemmow's prescription for transformation of the electromagnetic field in hyperbolic media and provides a review of recent developments in this active research area.

Physical Description

17 p.

Notes

Abstract: Hyperbolic materials enable numerous surprising applications that include far-field subwavelength imaging, nanolithography, and emission engineering. The wavevector of a plane wave in these media follows the surface of a hyperboloid in contrast to an ellipsoid for conventional anisotropic dielectric. The consequences of hyperbolic dispersion were first studied in the 50’s pertaining to the problems of electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth’s ionosphere and in the stratified artificial materials of transmission lines. Recent years have brought explosive growth in optics and photonics of hyperbolic media based on metamaterials across the optical spectrum. Here we summarize earlier theories in the Clemmow’s prescription for transformation of the electromagnetic field in hyperbolic media and provide a review of recent developments in this active research area.

Source

  • Optics Express, 2013. Washington, DC: Optical Society of America

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Optics Expres
  • Volume: 21
  • Issue: 12
  • Pages: 15048-15064
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • June 17, 2013

Submitted Date

  • May 23, 2013

Accepted Date

  • June 10, 2013

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 5, 2018, 8:11 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 1
Total Uses: 1

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Drachev, Vladimir P.; Podolskiy, Viktor A. & Kildishev, Alexander V. Hyperbolic metamaterials: new physics behind a classical problem, article, June 17, 2013; Washington, DC. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1212062/: accessed September 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.