Review of fluidized bed combustion technology in the United States

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The United States (US) initiated work in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) in the mid-1960s, with primary emphasis on industrial applications. With passage of the Clean Air Act in 1970, the environmental benefits of the technology soon attracted interest. This provided the impetus for expanded effort focused on the reduced NO/sub x/ emissions resulting from lower combustion temperature and SO/sub 2/ capture by means of chemical reaction with limestone or dolomite in the fluidized bed. The oil embargo in 1973 further stimulated interest in FBC technology. Several manufacturers presently offer atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) ... continued below

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Medium: P; Size: Pages: 23

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Krishnan, R.P.; Daw, C.S. & Jones, J.E. Jr. January 1, 1984.

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Description

The United States (US) initiated work in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) in the mid-1960s, with primary emphasis on industrial applications. With passage of the Clean Air Act in 1970, the environmental benefits of the technology soon attracted interest. This provided the impetus for expanded effort focused on the reduced NO/sub x/ emissions resulting from lower combustion temperature and SO/sub 2/ capture by means of chemical reaction with limestone or dolomite in the fluidized bed. The oil embargo in 1973 further stimulated interest in FBC technology. Several manufacturers presently offer atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units for industrial application in the United States. However, FBC for electric power generation remains in the development and demonstration phase. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) are operating a 20-MW AFBC utility pilot plant and are proceeding with plans for a 160-MW(e) demonstration plant with other participants. Research has been under way on pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) at Grimethorpe in South Yorkshire, England, and within the United States at the Curtiss-Wright Pilot Plant, and at other smaller test facilities. An emerging turbocharged PFBC concept will likely stimulate more near-term interest in PFBC technology for both industrial and utility applications. The major US programs and test facilities are described; remaining technical uncertainties are discussed, and the future outlook for the technology is assessed.

Physical Description

Medium: P; Size: Pages: 23

Notes

NTIS, PC A02/MF A01; 1.

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  • 16. ICHMT symposium on heat and mass transfer in fixed and fluidized beds, Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, 3 Sep 1984

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  • Other: DE85001105
  • Report No.: CONF-840942-1
  • Grant Number: AC05-84OR21400
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 6417195
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1204765

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • January 1, 1984

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 5, 2018, 11:11 p.m.

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  • Oct. 8, 2018, 12:55 p.m.

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Krishnan, R.P.; Daw, C.S. & Jones, J.E. Jr. Review of fluidized bed combustion technology in the United States, article, January 1, 1984; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1204765/: accessed November 13, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.