Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) Science Plan

One of 2 texts in the series: GLOBEC Report available on this site.

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Description

Human population and associated industrial activities continue to increase rapidly, and have reached levels that put the environment under stress in many areas of the world. In addition natural fluctuations of the Earth's physical and biological systems, often occur in time frames that are not readily evident to man. Such fluctuations cause additional stress on the environment, and can result in changes that impact society in terms of diminished availability of clean water, unspoiled land and natural vegetation, minerals, fish stocks, and clean air. Human societies are making a rapidly increasing number of policy and management decisions that attempt to ... continued below

Physical Description

82 p.

Creation Information

Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) 1997.

Context

This text is part of the collection entitled: Environmental Policy Collection and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 569 times , with 9 in the last month . More information about this text can be viewed below.

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  • IGBP Secretariat
    Publisher Info: http://igbp.net/
    Place of Publication: Stockholm, Sweden

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  • Main Title: Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) Science Plan
  • Series Title: IGBP Report
  • Series Title: GLOBEC Report
  • Added Title: International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) Report 40
  • Added Title: GLOBEC Report 9

Description

Human population and associated industrial activities continue to increase rapidly, and have reached levels that put the environment under stress in many areas of the world. In addition natural fluctuations of the Earth's physical and biological systems, often occur in time frames that are not readily evident to man. Such fluctuations cause additional stress on the environment, and can result in changes that impact society in terms of diminished availability of clean water, unspoiled land and natural vegetation, minerals, fish stocks, and clean air. Human societies are making a rapidly increasing number of policy and management decisions that attempt to allow both for natural fluctuations and to limit or modify human impact. Such decisions are often ineffective, as a result of economic, political and social constraints, and inadequate understanding of the interactions between human activities and natural responses. Improved understanding of such issues is important in its own right, and will contribute to ameliorating economic, political and social constraints. Developing improved understanding of environmental change is within the realm of the natural sciences and is being addressed by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and other programmes concerned with describing and understanding the Earth System. Natural variability, occurring over a variety of time scales, dominates the health of complex marine ecosystems, regardless of fishing or other environmental pressure. We are only now beginning to compile quantitative documentation of such variability, and consequently our knowledge concerning its causes remains at the level of hypotheses. Understanding of the role of variability in the functioning of marine ecosystems is essential if we are to effectively manage global marine living resources such as fisheries during this period of tremendously increased human impact, and concurrent dependence, on these resources.

Physical Description

82 p.

Notes

[harvested 2009-10-27]

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Environmental Policy Collection

The Environmental Policy Collection contains reports, policy documents, and media selected from local, statewide, national, and international organizations; government and private agencies; and scientific and research institutions. The collection also contains theses and dissertations relevant to environmental policy.

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Creation Date

  • 1997

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • March 16, 2010, 3:46 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • March 23, 2010, 1:19 p.m.

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Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC). Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) Science Plan, text, 1997; Stockholm, Sweden. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11997/: accessed May 25, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .