Dynamics of self-reorganization explains passivation of silicate glasses

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This article demonstrates that gel reorganization involving high exchange rate of oxygen and low exchange rate of silicon is the key mechanism accounting for extremely low apparent water diffusivity.

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9 p.

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Gin, Stéphane; Collin, Marie; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Minet, Yves; Dupuy, Laurent et al. June 4, 2018.

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This article demonstrates that gel reorganization involving high exchange rate of oxygen and low exchange rate of silicon is the key mechanism accounting for extremely low apparent water diffusivity.

Physical Description

9 p.

Notes

Abstract: Understanding the dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals from atomic to macroscopic
levels is a challenge with major implications in geoscience and industry. One of the main
uncertainties limiting the development of predictive models lies in the formation of an
amorphous surface layer––called gel––that can in some circumstances control the reactivity
of the buried interface. Here, we report experimental and simulation results deciphering the
mechanisms by which the gel becomes passivating. The study conducted on a six-oxide
borosilicate glass shows that gel reorganization involving high exchange rate of oxygen and
low exchange rate of silicon is the key mechanism accounting for extremely low apparent
water diffusivity (∼10−²¹m² s−¹), which could be rate-limiting for the overall reaction. These
findings could be used to improve kinetic models, and inspire the development of new
molecular sieve materials with tailored properties as well as highly durable glass for application
in extreme environments.

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  • Nature Communications, 2018. London, UK: Nature Publishing Group

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  • Publication Title: Nature Communications
  • Volume: 2018
  • Pages: 1-10
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • June 4, 2018

Submitted Date

  • December 29, 2017

Accepted Date

  • April 10, 2018

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 15, 2018, 10:41 p.m.

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Gin, Stéphane; Collin, Marie; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Minet, Yves; Dupuy, Laurent et al. Dynamics of self-reorganization explains passivation of silicate glasses, article, June 4, 2018; London, United Kingdom. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1164547/: accessed September 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Engineering.