Preventing Thermal Degradation of Pvc Insulation by Mixtures of Cross-Linking Agents and Antioxidants

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Poly(vinyl chloride)(PVC) wire and cable insulation has poor thermal stability, causing the plasticizer to separate from the PVC chain and produce an oily residue, lowering the tensile elongation at break and thus increasing brittleness. We have added 4 wt.% of three different types of cross-linking agents and antioxidants, as well as mixtures of both, to improve the thermal stability of the plasticizer and tensile properties of PVC after thermal exposure. We performed tensile tests, tribological tests, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and water absorption determination before and after thermal exposure at 136 ℃ for 1 week. After adding the agents, elongation ... continued below

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Kim, Taehwan May 2018.

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  • Kim, Taehwan

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Poly(vinyl chloride)(PVC) wire and cable insulation has poor thermal stability, causing the plasticizer to separate from the PVC chain and produce an oily residue, lowering the tensile elongation at break and thus increasing brittleness. We have added 4 wt.% of three different types of cross-linking agents and antioxidants, as well as mixtures of both, to improve the thermal stability of the plasticizer and tensile properties of PVC after thermal exposure. We performed tensile tests, tribological tests, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and water absorption determination before and after thermal exposure at 136 ℃ for 1 week. After adding the agents, elongation at break increased by 10 to 20 % while the wear rate and water absorption were lower than for the control sample. Less voids are seen in the SEM images after adding these two kinds of agents. The thermal resistance of the PVC cable insulation is best enhanced by combinations of cross-linking agents and antioxidants.

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  • May 2018

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  • June 6, 2018, 1:19 p.m.

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Kim, Taehwan. Preventing Thermal Degradation of Pvc Insulation by Mixtures of Cross-Linking Agents and Antioxidants, thesis, May 2018; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1157547/: accessed July 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .