Running Head: Faithful Health Norms

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This article applies a structural theory analysis to understand the ways by which religious adherents adopt and enact health norms.

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10 p.

Creation Information

Mpofu, Elias April 9, 2018.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 28 times , with 11 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Mpofu, Elias University of North Texas; University of Sydney; University of Johannesburg

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Description

This article applies a structural theory analysis to understand the ways by which religious adherents adopt and enact health norms.

Physical Description

10 p.

Notes

Abstract: Religious communities influence health-related behaviors of adherents in important ways
for public health promotion. Questions remain about the processes involved and resultant health
promotion actions of the religious adherents. This study applied a structural theory analysis to
understand the ways by which religious adherents adopt and enact health norms. Structural theory
proposes systemic influences on behavioral predispositions at the latent, interpretive, and elective
levels. Latent influences on health norms occur through a process of social mediation, predisposing
the religious adherents to impute faith-aligned meanings to their health norms. Religious adherents
also might adopt interpretation to guide their health norms in those grey areas in which faith-based
guidelines are not apparent or open to contestation. Moreover, religious adherents may elect to
construct health norms combining faith-aligned and prevailing secular community standards. Public
health promotion with religious adherents should address their faith-aligned health beliefs while
also addressing their evolving personal health norms.

Source

  • Religions, 2018. Basel, Switzerland: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

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Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Religions
  • Volume: 9
  • Pages: 1-10
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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Submitted Date

  • January 18, 2018

Accepted Date

  • April 4, 2018

Creation Date

  • April 9, 2018

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 16, 2018, 2:54 p.m.

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Mpofu, Elias. Running Head: Faithful Health Norms, article, April 9, 2018; Basel, Switzerland. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1152233/: accessed December 10, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service.