Role of Hypoxia in the Evolution and Development of the Cardiovascular System

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Article on the role of hypoxia in the evolution and development of the cardiovascular system.

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15 p.

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Fisher, Steven A. & Burggren, Warren W. 2007.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Arts and Sciences to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 308 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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Article on the role of hypoxia in the evolution and development of the cardiovascular system.

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15 p.

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Abstract: How multicellular organisms obtain and use oxygen and other substrates has evolved over hundreds of millions of years in parallel with the evolution of oxygen-delivery systems. A steady supply of oxygen is critical to the existence of organisms that depend on oxygen as a primary source of fuel (i.e., those that live by aerobic metabolism). Not surprisingly, a number of mechanisms have evolved to defend against oxygen deprivation. This review highlights evolutionary and developmental aspects of O(2) delivery to allow understanding of adaptive responses to O(2) deprivation (hypoxia). First, the authors consider how the drive for more efficient oxygen delivery from the heart to the periphery may have shaped the evolution of the cardiovascular system, with particular attention to the routing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood in the cardiac outlet. Then the authors consider the role of O(2) in the morphogenesis and the cardiovascular system of animals of increasing size and complexity. The authors conclude by suggesting areas for future research regarding the role of oxygen deprivation and oxidative stress in the normal development of the heart and vascular or in the pathogenesis of congenital heart defects.

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  • Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, 2007, New Rochelle: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., pp. 1339-1353

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  • Publication Title: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling
  • Volume: 9
  • Issue: 9
  • Page Start: 1339
  • Page End: 1352
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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  • 2007

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  • Nov. 12, 2012, 1:02 p.m.

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  • Feb. 20, 2014, 12:12 p.m.

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Fisher, Steven A. & Burggren, Warren W. Role of Hypoxia in the Evolution and Development of the Cardiovascular System, article, 2007; [New Rochelle, New York]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc115191/: accessed June 27, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.