“What Are You?”: Racial Ambiguity and the Social Construction of Race in the Us Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title “What Are You?”: Racial Ambiguity and the Social Construction of Race in the Us

Creator

  • Author: Smith, Starita
    Creator Type: Personal

Contributor

  • Chair: Yancey, George A.
    Contributor Type: Personal
    Contributor Info: Major Professor
  • Committee Member: Lawson, Erma
    Contributor Type: Personal
    Contributor Info: Minor Professor
  • Committee Member: Moore, Amie
    Contributor Type: Personal
  • Committee Member: Keating, AnaLouise
    Contributor Type: Personal

Publisher

  • Name: University of North Texas
    Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
    Additional Info: www.unt.edu

Date

  • Creation: 2012-05

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: This dissertation is a qualitative study of racially ambiguous people and their life experiences. Racially ambiguous people are individuals who are frequently misidentified racially by others because they do not resemble the phenotype associated with the racial group to which they belong or because they belong to racial/ethnic groups originating in different parts of the world that resemble each other. the racial/ethnic population of the United States is constantly changing because of variations in the birth rates among the racial/ethnic groups that comprise those populations and immigration from around the world. Although much research has been done that documents the existence of racial/ethnic mixing in the history of the United States and the world, this multiracial history is seldom acknowledged in the social, work, and other spheres of interaction among people in the U.S., instead a racialized system based on the perception of individuals as mono-racial thus easily identified through (skin tone, hair texture, facial features, etc.). This is research was done using life experience interviews with 24 racially ambiguous individuals to determine how race/ethnicity has affected their lives and how they negotiate the minefield of race.

Subject

  • Keyword: Racial ambiguity
  • Keyword: Hispanic identity
  • Keyword: racial identity

Collection

  • Name: UNT Theses and Dissertations
    Code: UNTETD

Institution

  • Name: UNT Libraries
    Code: UNT

Rights

  • Rights Access: public
  • Rights Holder: Smith, Starita
  • Rights License: copyright
  • Rights Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights Reserved.

Resource Type

  • Thesis or Dissertation

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc115163

Degree

  • Academic Department: Department of Sociology
  • Degree Discipline: Sociology
  • Degree Level: Doctoral
  • Degree Name: Doctor of Philosophy
  • Degree Grantor: University of North Texas
  • Degree Publication Type: disse

Note