Reverberation Mapping of High-Luminosity Quasars

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This article presents the CIV BLR size and luminosity relation over eight orders of magnitude in luminosity, pushing the luminosity limit to its highest point so far.

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6 p.

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Kaspi, Shai; Brandt, William Nielsen; Maoz, Dan; Netzer, Hagai; Schneider, Donald P. & Shemmer, Ohad October 30, 2017.

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This article presents the CIV BLR size and luminosity relation over eight orders of magnitude in luminosity, pushing the luminosity limit to its highest point so far.

Physical Description

6 p.

Notes

Abstract: Over the past three decades reverberation mapping (RM) has been applied to about 100
AGNs. Their broad line region (BLR) sizes were measured and yielded mass estimates
of the black holes in their center. However, very few attempts were carried out for
high-luminosity quasars, at luminosities higher than 1046 erg/sec in the optical. Most
of these attempts failed since RM of such quasars is difficult due to a number of
reasons, mostly due to the long time needed to monitor these objects. During the
past two decades we carried out a RM campaign on six high-luminosity quasars. This
contribution presents some of the final light curves of that RM campaign in which we
measured the BLR size in C IV of three of the objects (S5 0836+71, SBS 1116+603,
and SBS 1425+606). We present the C IV BLR size and luminosity relation over eight
orders of magnitude in luminosity, pushing the luminosity limit to its highest point so far.

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  • Frontiers in Astronomy and Space Sciences, 2017. Lausanne, Switzerland: Frontiers Research Foundation

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  • Publication Title: Frontiers in Astronomy and Space Sciences
  • Volume: 4
  • Pages: 1-6
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • August 31, 2017

Accepted Date

  • October 12, 2017

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  • October 30, 2017

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 1, 2018, 12:41 a.m.

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Kaspi, Shai; Brandt, William Nielsen; Maoz, Dan; Netzer, Hagai; Schneider, Donald P. & Shemmer, Ohad. Reverberation Mapping of High-Luminosity Quasars, article, October 30, 2017; Lausanne, Switzerland. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1132757/: accessed June 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.