Effect of Substrate Support on Dynamic Graphene/Metal Electrical Contacts

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Description

This article investigates the stability of dynamic electrical contacts at a graphene/metal interface using atomic force microscopy (AFM), under static conditions with variable normal loads and under sliding conditions with variable speeds.

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9 p.

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Lee, Jihyung; Hu, Xiaoli; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Martini, Ashlie & Berman, Diana April 7, 2018.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Engineering to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 15 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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Description

This article investigates the stability of dynamic electrical contacts at a graphene/metal interface using atomic force microscopy (AFM), under static conditions with variable normal loads and under sliding conditions with variable speeds.

Physical Description

9 p.

Notes

Abstract: Recent advances in graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) material synthesis and
characterization have led to their use in emerging technologies, including flexible electronics.
However, a major challenge is electrical contact stability, especially under mechanical straining
or dynamic loading, which can be important for 2D material use in microelectromechanical systems.
In this letter, we investigate the stability of dynamic electrical contacts at a graphene/metal interface
using atomic force microscopy (AFM), under static conditions with variable normal loads and under
sliding conditions with variable speeds. Our results demonstrate that contact resistance depends on
the nature of the graphene support, specifically whether the graphene is free-standing or supported
by a substrate, as well as on the contact load and sliding velocity. The results of the dynamic AFM
experiments are corroborated by simulations, which show that the presence of a stiff substrate,
increased load, and reduced sliding velocity lead to a more stable low-resistance contact.

Source

  • Micromachines, 2018. Basel, Switzerland: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

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Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Micromachines
  • Volume: 9
  • Pages: 1-9
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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Submitted Date

  • March 22, 2018

Accepted Date

  • April 6, 2018

Creation Date

  • April 7, 2018

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 1, 2018, 12:41 a.m.

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Lee, Jihyung; Hu, Xiaoli; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Martini, Ashlie & Berman, Diana. Effect of Substrate Support on Dynamic Graphene/Metal Electrical Contacts, article, April 7, 2018; Basel, Switzerland. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1132754/: accessed November 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Engineering.