Utilizing Transgender Patient Health Care Experiences To Address Future Physicians' Gaps In Knowledge

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

This poster describes a project to create a free, open-access, web-based curriculum designed to educate medical students and residents on how to give compassionate care to disadvantaged populations who are in great need of consistent, stigma-free, and socially informed health care.

Physical Description

1 poster : ill. ; 83 x 137 cm.

Creation Information

Moore, Antoinette & Keralis, Spencer D. C. February 2, 2018.

Context

This poster is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 75 times , with 6 in the last month . More information about this poster can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this poster or its content.

Authors

Provided By

UNT Libraries

The UNT Libraries serve the university and community by providing access to physical and online collections, fostering information literacy, supporting academic research, and much, much more.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this poster. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

This poster describes a project to create a free, open-access, web-based curriculum designed to educate medical students and residents on how to give compassionate care to disadvantaged populations who are in great need of consistent, stigma-free, and socially informed health care.

Physical Description

1 poster : ill. ; 83 x 137 cm.

Notes

Background: Despite increasing public awareness of the discrimination faced by transgender people, transgender health care continues fall short, with literature pointing to stigma as well as overt transphobia as reasons why transgender individuals skip necessary visits to the physician. Many practicing physicians feel uncomfortable taking care of transgender patients, even when conducting health care visits that focus on benign topics, like management of essential hypertension in a 50 year-old trans female. Where do we intervene? How do we utilize medical education to improve transgender health care with the next generation of physicians? Through storytelling- by transgender people themselves. Methods: This project is in the early stages of development and recently achieved IRB approval through the University of North Texas at Denton. Subjects are currently being recruited. The project proposes to create a free, open-access, web-based curriculum designed to educate medical students and residents on how to give compassionate care to disadvantaged populations who are in great need of consistent, stigma-free, and socially informed health care. Curricula surrounding transgender patient care will be the first module of many in this series, which will include obese patients, chronic pain patients, HIV+ individuals, patients with addiction disorders, and many more. Goals: While the goal of this project is to create a flexible online teaching environment that easily molds into existing medical school curricula across the country, these researchers also wish to collect significant analytics from the curriculum. The site will be supported by an online dashboard allowing for access of modules, tracking completed modules and awarding certificates of completion, and importantly will be a reservoir of analytics provided from pre and post test surveys. Conclusion: We hypothesize that via utilizing patient oral histories presented in a documentary film format, medical students can improve their perceived empathy towards underserved populations, beginning with our first collection of stories by transgender patients. We believe this is a low-cost, easily implemented, and effective way to combat the decline in empathy medical students experience during their training and subsequent transition to the workforce. Reaching out to medical students before they become physicians is a well-timed intervention to improve compassionate care towards vulnerable populations.

Source

  • 2018 Conference on Medical Student Education, February 1-4, 2018. Austin, Texas.

Language

Item Type

Collections

This poster is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

What responsibilities do I have when using this poster?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this poster.

Creation Date

  • February 2, 2018

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Feb. 28, 2018, 6:41 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this poster last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 6
Total Uses: 75

Interact With This Poster

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Enlarge

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Moore, Antoinette & Keralis, Spencer D. C. Utilizing Transgender Patient Health Care Experiences To Address Future Physicians' Gaps In Knowledge, poster, February 2, 2018; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1114915/: accessed December 15, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .