Application of district heating system to U. S. urban areas

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In the last few decades district-heating systems have been widely used in a number of European countries using waste heat from electric generation or refuse incineration, as well as energy from primary sources such as geothermal wells or fossil-fired boilers. The current world status of district-heat utilization is summarized. Cost and implementation projections for district-heating systems in the U. S. are discussed in comparison with existing modes of space conditioning and domestic water heating. A substantial fraction, i.e., up to approximately one-half of the U.S. population could employ district-heating systems using waste heat, with present population-distribution patterns. U.S. energy usage ... continued below

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Pages: 29

Creation Information

Karkheck, J. & Powell, J. January 1, 1978.

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Description

In the last few decades district-heating systems have been widely used in a number of European countries using waste heat from electric generation or refuse incineration, as well as energy from primary sources such as geothermal wells or fossil-fired boilers. The current world status of district-heat utilization is summarized. Cost and implementation projections for district-heating systems in the U. S. are discussed in comparison with existing modes of space conditioning and domestic water heating. A substantial fraction, i.e., up to approximately one-half of the U.S. population could employ district-heating systems using waste heat, with present population-distribution patterns. U.S. energy usage would be reduced by an equivalent of approximately 30 percent of current oil imports. Detailed analyses of a number of urban areas are used to formulate conceptual district energy-supply systems, potential implementation levels, and projected energy costs. Important national ancillary economic and social benefits are described, and potential difficulties relating to the implementation of district-heating systems in the U.S. are discussed. District-heating systems appear very attractive for meeting future U.S. energy needs. The technology is well established. The cost/benefit yield is favorable, and the conservation potential is significant. District heating can be applied in urban and densely populated suburban areas. The remaining demand, in rural and low-population-density communities, appears to be better suited to other forms of system substitution.

Physical Description

Pages: 29

Notes

Dep. NTIS, PC A03/MF A01.

Source

  • AAAS meeting- Abstract cleared 9/22/77 with the title, ''Is Zero Energy Growth Feasible in the Residential Sector.'', Washington, DC, USA, Feb 1978

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  • Report No.: BNL-25022
  • Report No.: CONF-780228-3
  • Grant Number: EY-76-C-02-0016
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 6158186
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1112048

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • January 1, 1978

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Feb. 22, 2018, 7:45 p.m.

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  • April 23, 2018, 1:28 p.m.

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Karkheck, J. & Powell, J. Application of district heating system to U. S. urban areas, article, January 1, 1978; Upton, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1112048/: accessed May 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.