Formulaic sequences in English conversation: Improving spoken fluency in non-native speakers.

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Native speakers often ignore the limitless potential of language and stick to institutionalized formulaic sequences. These sequences are stored and processed as wholes, rather than as the individual words and grammatical rules which make them up. Due to research on formulaic sequence in spoken language, English as a Second Language / Foreign Language pedagogy has begun to follow suit. There has been a call for a shift from the traditional focus on isolated grammar and vocabulary to formulaic sequences and context. I tested this hypothesis with 19 L2 English learners who received 5 weeks of task-based instruction and found substantial ... continued below

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McGuire, Michael August 2009.

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  • McGuire, Michael

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Native speakers often ignore the limitless potential of language and stick to institutionalized formulaic sequences. These sequences are stored and processed as wholes, rather than as the individual words and grammatical rules which make them up. Due to research on formulaic sequence in spoken language, English as a Second Language / Foreign Language pedagogy has begun to follow suit. There has been a call for a shift from the traditional focus on isolated grammar and vocabulary to formulaic sequences and context. I tested this hypothesis with 19 L2 English learners who received 5 weeks of task-based instruction and found substantial progress in oral fluency only for the experimental group. Differences between pretest and posttest oral fluency were examined by looking at the learners' speech rate and their mean length of run. Subjective evaluation of fluency by 16 native English judges confirmed the calculated measures.

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  • August 2009

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 19, 2009, 8:18 p.m.

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  • April 1, 2010, 3:02 p.m.

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McGuire, Michael. Formulaic sequences in English conversation: Improving spoken fluency in non-native speakers., thesis, August 2009; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11024/: accessed November 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .