Deliberative Democracy, Divided Societies, and the Case of Appalachia

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Theories of deliberative democracy, which emphasize open-mindedness and cooperative dialogue, confront serious challenges in deeply divided political populations constituted by polarized citizens unwilling to work together on issues they collectively face. The case of mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachia makes this clear. In my thesis, I argue that such empirical challenges are serious, yet do not compromise the normative desirability of deliberative democracy because communicative mechanisms can help transform adversarial perspectives into workable, deliberative ones. To realize this potential in divided societies, mechanisms must focus on healing and reconciliation, a point under-theorized by deliberativists who do not take seriously ... continued below

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Tidrick, Charlee August 2009.

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  • Tidrick, Charlee

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Description

Theories of deliberative democracy, which emphasize open-mindedness and cooperative dialogue, confront serious challenges in deeply divided political populations constituted by polarized citizens unwilling to work together on issues they collectively face. The case of mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachia makes this clear. In my thesis, I argue that such empirical challenges are serious, yet do not compromise the normative desirability of deliberative democracy because communicative mechanisms can help transform adversarial perspectives into workable, deliberative ones. To realize this potential in divided societies, mechanisms must focus on healing and reconciliation, a point under-theorized by deliberativists who do not take seriously enough the feminist critique of public-private dualisms that illuminates political dimensions of such embodied processes. Ultimately, only a distinctly two-stage process of public deliberation in divided populations, beginning with mechanisms for healing and trust building, will give rise to the self-transformation necessary for second-stage deliberation aimed at collectively binding decisions.

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  • August 2009

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  • Nov. 19, 2009, 8:18 p.m.

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  • April 1, 2010, 2:49 p.m.

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Tidrick, Charlee. Deliberative Democracy, Divided Societies, and the Case of Appalachia, thesis, August 2009; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11007/: accessed October 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .