The use of AMS to the biomedical sciences

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The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) began making AMS measurements in 1989. Biomedical experiments were originally limited by sample preparation techniques, but we expect the number of biomedical samples to increase five-fold. While many of the detailed techniques for making biomedical measurements resemble those used in other fields, biological tracer experiments differ substantially from the observational approaches of earth science investigators. The role of xenobiotius in initiating mutations in cells is of particular interest. One measure of the damage caused to the genetic material is obtained by counting the number of adducts formed by a chemical agent at a ... continued below

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Pages: (17 p)

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Vogel, J.S. April 1, 1991.

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The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) began making AMS measurements in 1989. Biomedical experiments were originally limited by sample preparation techniques, but we expect the number of biomedical samples to increase five-fold. While many of the detailed techniques for making biomedical measurements resemble those used in other fields, biological tracer experiments differ substantially from the observational approaches of earth science investigators. The role of xenobiotius in initiating mutations in cells is of particular interest. One measure of the damage caused to the genetic material is obtained by counting the number of adducts formed by a chemical agent at a given dose. AMS allows direct measurement of the number of adducts through stoichiometric quantification of the {sup 14}C label attached to the DNA after exposure to a labelled carcinogen. Other isotopes of interest include tritium, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 79}SE, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 26}Al and {sup 129}I. Our experiments with low dose environmental carcinogens reflect the protocols which will become a common part of biomedical AMS. In biomedical experiments, the researcher defines the carbon to be analyzed through dissection and/or chemical purification; thus the sample is merely'' combusted and graphitized at the AMS facility. However, since biomedical samples can have a {sup 14}C range of five orders of magnitude, preparation of graphite required construction of a special manifold to prevent cross-contamination. Additionally, a strain of {sup 14}C-depleted C57BL/6 mice is being developed to further reduce background in biomedical experiments. AMS has a bright and diverse future in radioisotope tracing. Such work requires a dedicated amalgamation of AMS scientists and biomedical researchers who will redesign experimental protocols to maximize the AMS technique and minimize the danger of catastrophic contamination. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

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Pages: (17 p)

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OSTI; NTIS; INIS; GPO Dep.

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  • Environment Canada workshop on Canadian requirements for The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), Burlington, Ontario (Canada), 15-16 Apr 1991

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  • Other: DE91012037
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-107116
  • Report No.: CONF-9104245--1
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 5860136
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1099787

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  • April 1, 1991

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  • Feb. 18, 2018, 3:59 p.m.

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  • March 2, 2018, 5:23 p.m.

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Vogel, J.S. The use of AMS to the biomedical sciences, article, April 1, 1991; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1099787/: accessed April 26, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.