Scoping of fusion-driven retorting of oil shale

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In the time frame beyond 2005, fusion reactors are likely to make their first appearance when the oil shale industry will probably be operating with 20% of the production derived from surface retorts operating on deep mined shale from in situ retorts and 80% from shale retorted within these in situ retorts using relatively fine shale uniformly rubblized by expensive mining methods. A process was developed where fusion reactors supply a 600/sup 0/C mixture of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor to both surface and in situ retorts. The in situ production is accomplished by inert gas retorting, without oxygen, ... continued below

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Pages: 11

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Galloway, T.R. November 1, 1979.

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Description

In the time frame beyond 2005, fusion reactors are likely to make their first appearance when the oil shale industry will probably be operating with 20% of the production derived from surface retorts operating on deep mined shale from in situ retorts and 80% from shale retorted within these in situ retorts using relatively fine shale uniformly rubblized by expensive mining methods. A process was developed where fusion reactors supply a 600/sup 0/C mixture of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor to both surface and in situ retorts. The in situ production is accomplished by inert gas retorting, without oxygen, avoiding the burning of oil released from the larger shale particles produced in a simpler mining method. These fusion reactor-heated gases retort the oil from four 50x50x200m in-situ rubble beds at high rate of 40m/d and high yield (i.e., 95% F.A.), which provided high return on investment around 20% for the syncrude selling at $20/bbl, or 30% if sold as $30/bbl for heating oil. The bed of 600/sup 0/C retorted shale, or char, left behind was then burned by the admission of ambient air in order to recover all of the possible energy from the shale resource. The hot combustion gases, mostly nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water vapor are then heat-exchanged with fusion reactor blanket coolant flow to be sequentially introduced into the next rubble bed ready for retorting. The advantages of this fusion-driven retorting process concept are a cheaper mining method, high yield and higher production rate system, processing with shale grades down to 50 l/mg (12 gpt), improved resource recovery by complete char utilization and low energy losses by leaving behind a cold, spent bed.

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Pages: 11

Notes

Dep. NTIS, PC A02/MF A01.

Source

  • 8. symposium on engineering problems of fusion research, San Francisco, CA, USA, 13 Nov 1979

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  • Report No.: UCRL-83006
  • Report No.: CONF-791102-69
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 5748992
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1098908

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • November 1, 1979

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  • Feb. 18, 2018, 3:59 p.m.

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  • March 30, 2018, 12:19 p.m.

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Galloway, T.R. Scoping of fusion-driven retorting of oil shale, article, November 1, 1979; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1098908/: accessed April 26, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.