Relating productivity to visibility and lighting

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The problem of determining the appropriate light levels for visual tasks is a cost-benefit problem. Existing light level recommendations seriously underweight the importance of economic factors. Furthermore, the relative importance of the visibility factors in determining the optimal light levels appears inconsistent with the importance of these factors in determining visibility and visual performance. It is shown that calculations based on acuities give a lower limit of 100 to 200 lux for cost-effective light levels for office tasks. Upper limits are calculated from correlations of task performance to visibility levels. Visibility levels become progressively insensitive to luminance as luminance increases. ... continued below

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Pages: 24

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Clear, R. & Berman, S. January 1, 1982.

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Description

The problem of determining the appropriate light levels for visual tasks is a cost-benefit problem. Existing light level recommendations seriously underweight the importance of economic factors. Furthermore, the relative importance of the visibility factors in determining the optimal light levels appears inconsistent with the importance of these factors in determining visibility and visual performance. It is shown that calculations based on acuities give a lower limit of 100 to 200 lux for cost-effective light levels for office tasks. Upper limits are calculated from correlations of task performance to visibility levels. Visibility levels become progressively insensitive to luminance as luminance increases. Average power densities above 100 watts/m/sup 2/ are cost-effective only when visibility is very low. However, there is a 3-to-10 times larger increase in benefits from improving contrast or contrast sensitivity than from using more than 10 watts/m/sup 2/. Contrast or contrast sensitivity can be improved by using forms with larger print, using xerographic copy instead of carbon or mimeo, making sure office workers have the right eyeglasses, or even by transferring workers with visual problems to less visually demanding tasks. Once these changes are made it is no longer cost-effective to use more than 10 watts/m/sup 2/. This conclusion raises serious questions about recommendations that lead to greater than about 10 watts/m/sup 2/ of installed lighting for general office work.

Physical Description

Pages: 24

Notes

NTIS, PC A02/MF A01.

Source

  • Public Works Canada symposium, Ottawa, Canada, 25 Jan 1982

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  • Other: DE82008598
  • Report No.: LBL-13931
  • Report No.: CONF-820141-1
  • Report No.: EEB-L-82-03
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 5484227
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1093197

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • January 1, 1982

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Feb. 10, 2018, 10:06 p.m.

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  • April 25, 2018, 1:42 p.m.

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Clear, R. & Berman, S. Relating productivity to visibility and lighting, article, January 1, 1982; [Berkeley,] California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1093197/: accessed September 25, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.