Separated K/sup -/ beams (10 GeV and above)

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Proton intensities now available at the AGS are considerably higher than just a few years ago and there are steps planned which should increase the accelerated intensities by a factor of four or more by 1988/89. Longer term plans would introduce a stretcher ring to allow for rapid pulsing of the AGS with a continuous spill. The LAMPF II proposal, if approved, would offer still more protons. Separated kaon beams with intensity similar to our present pion beams are, in fact, possible to build now, with the potential of even high kaon flux in the future. It is particularly attractive ... continued below

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Pages: 4

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Bunce, G.M. January 1, 1985.

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Proton intensities now available at the AGS are considerably higher than just a few years ago and there are steps planned which should increase the accelerated intensities by a factor of four or more by 1988/89. Longer term plans would introduce a stretcher ring to allow for rapid pulsing of the AGS with a continuous spill. The LAMPF II proposal, if approved, would offer still more protons. Separated kaon beams with intensity similar to our present pion beams are, in fact, possible to build now, with the potential of even high kaon flux in the future. It is particularly attractive to work with a kaon minus beam due to the large number of final state combinations which would be available, due to the strange quark. Pion beams, being made of the same quarks as targets, are not so enticing. And yet our spectroscopy has so far been dominated by the pion results; kaon experiments have been more difficult with a factor of 50 to 100 lower intensity, and separated beams have only been possible up to about 6 GeV/c. The exception here is the rf-separated beam at CERN (and earlier rf-separated beams to bubble chambers at CERN and BNL). In the AGS-II Task Force Report, Cason and Donoghue showed that a kaon beam combined with a complete spectrometer capable of observing both neutral and charged particles would increase the available states for spectroscopy for masses from 1 to 3 GeV by a factor of 10. They urged a complete mapping of states, using a sky survey as an analogy. Our present capability is similar to scans of the sky made only in the optical range. They also point out that the specific subject of confinement - whether there can be combinations of quarks and gluons not yet seen - is an exciting topic which is beginning to get theoretical guidance from QCD calculations on a lattice. This confluence of technical advance (intensity) and physics interest (confinement) makes a separated kaon beam particularly compelling. 9 refs.

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Pages: 4

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NTIS, PC A02/MF A01.

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  • International conference on hadron spectroscopy, College Park, MD, USA, 20 Apr 1985

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  • Other: DE85012527
  • Report No.: BNL-36450
  • Report No.: CONF-8504133-2
  • Grant Number: AC02-76CH00016
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 5526627
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1092743

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  • January 1, 1985

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  • Feb. 10, 2018, 10:06 p.m.

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  • April 23, 2018, 7:31 p.m.

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Bunce, G.M. Separated K/sup -/ beams (10 GeV and above), article, January 1, 1985; Upton, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1092743/: accessed October 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.