Inertial fusion power for space applications

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More than thirty-seven design concepts have been proposed for terrestrial ICF power plants. The design space is large because of the many allowable driver and reaction chamber combinations. These design studies have illustrated advantages of ICF power plants over other sources in lower impact on the environment, high safety, and almost no dependence on consumables like fuel. The fact that, once built, a 1000 MW/sub e/ ICF power plant would require only 240 kg of deuterium and from 770 to 9260 kg of lithium to run for five years (at 70% capacity factor) makes it potentially attractive for space power ... continued below

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Pages: 8

Creation Information

Meier, W.R.; Hogan, W.J.; Hoffman, N.J.; Murray, K.A. & Olson, R.E. May 19, 1986.

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Description

More than thirty-seven design concepts have been proposed for terrestrial ICF power plants. The design space is large because of the many allowable driver and reaction chamber combinations. These design studies have illustrated advantages of ICF power plants over other sources in lower impact on the environment, high safety, and almost no dependence on consumables like fuel. The fact that, once built, a 1000 MW/sub e/ ICF power plant would require only 240 kg of deuterium and from 770 to 9260 kg of lithium to run for five years (at 70% capacity factor) makes it potentially attractive for space power also. However, the designs proposed to date have emphasized features that would make the plant attractive for terrestrial applications, where economics, efficiency, and environmental considerations dominate. The resulting plants are large and contain many very heavy components that would not be at attractive for space applications. In this paper, we evaluate alternative ICF driver and reactor technologies using space application criteria and also discuss how some of those technologies can be altered to produce smaller, lighter fusion power sources for space.

Physical Description

Pages: 8

Notes

NTIS, PC A02/MF A01; 1.

Source

  • Intersociety energy conversion engineering conference, San Diego, CA, USA, 25 Aug 1986

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  • Other: DE86011879
  • Report No.: UCRL-94138
  • Report No.: CONF-860810-22
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 5365646
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1071420

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • May 19, 1986

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Feb. 4, 2018, 10:51 a.m.

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  • April 4, 2018, 12:41 p.m.

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Meier, W.R.; Hogan, W.J.; Hoffman, N.J.; Murray, K.A. & Olson, R.E. Inertial fusion power for space applications, article, May 19, 1986; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1071420/: accessed September 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.