Aurora status and plans

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Aurora is a short wavelength (248 nm) 10 to kJ KrF laser systems in the ICF program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is both an experiment in driver technology and a means for studying target performance using KrF laser light. Both features will be used to help evaluate the uv excimer laser as a viable fusion driver. The system has been designed to employ several electron-beam pumped amplifiers in series, with a final aperture of one meter square, to amplify 96 angularly mulitplexed 5 ns beamlets to the 10 kJ level. In Phase I, 48 of these beamlets are ... continued below

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Pages: 27

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Kristal, R.; Blair, L.S.; Burrows, M.D.; Cartwright, D.C.; Goldstone, P.D.; Greene, D.P. et al. October 1, 1987.

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Description

Aurora is a short wavelength (248 nm) 10 to kJ KrF laser systems in the ICF program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is both an experiment in driver technology and a means for studying target performance using KrF laser light. Both features will be used to help evaluate the uv excimer laser as a viable fusion driver. The system has been designed to employ several electron-beam pumped amplifiers in series, with a final aperture of one meter square, to amplify 96 angularly mulitplexed 5 ns beamlets to the 10 kJ level. In Phase I, 48 of these beamlets are brought to target by demultiplexing and focusing with f26 optics. The beamlet ensemble, contained within an f1.9 bundle, is focused as a single beam;however, pointing is done individually. Spot size in the target plane is variable from 0.1-4 mm, with maximum averaged intensity of )similarreverse arrowto) 4 x 10/sup 15/ Wcm/sup 2/. The illumination geometry is designed specifically for several classes of important target physics experiments. These include: energy flow, symmetry and preheat studies related to indirectly driven targets;x-ray conversion and plasma coupling characterization on disc targets, and hydrodynamic instability studies in planar geometry. System integration is proceeding toward initial target experiments in )similarreverse arrowto) late 1988. Ninety-six beam amplification through the penultimate amplifier has been obtained at the sub-kJ level. Installation of beam train optics is proceeding, and the target system vacuum envelope is in place. 18 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

Physical Description

Pages: 27

Notes

NTIS, PC A03/MF A01; 1.

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  • 8. international workshop on laser interaction and related plasma phenomena, Monterey, CA, USA, 27 Oct 1987

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  • Other: DE88006476
  • Report No.: LA-UR-88-409
  • Report No.: CONF-871093-5
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 5222409
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1069315

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  • October 1, 1987

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  • Feb. 4, 2018, 10:51 a.m.

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  • May 21, 2018, 7:02 p.m.

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Kristal, R.; Blair, L.S.; Burrows, M.D.; Cartwright, D.C.; Goldstone, P.D.; Greene, D.P. et al. Aurora status and plans, article, October 1, 1987; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1069315/: accessed July 15, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.