Improving the energy efficiency of residential clothes dryers

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Description

An experimental study on energy efficient electrical domestic clothes dryers is presented. A literature survey was performed and four basic energy saving techniques were identified: (1) reduced air flow rate and heater input, (2) recirculation of a portion of the exhaust air back into the clothes dryer, (3) heat recovery, utilizing an air-to-air heat exchanger, and (4) 100% recirculation of air through the dryer and a heat pump to condense water out of the air. Reduced air flow rate and heater input leads to energy savings around 8%, while recirculation of exhaust air reduces the energy consumption by approximately 18%. ... continued below

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Pages: 79

Creation Information

Hekmat, D. & Fisk, W.J. July 1, 1983.

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Description

An experimental study on energy efficient electrical domestic clothes dryers is presented. A literature survey was performed and four basic energy saving techniques were identified: (1) reduced air flow rate and heater input, (2) recirculation of a portion of the exhaust air back into the clothes dryer, (3) heat recovery, utilizing an air-to-air heat exchanger, and (4) 100% recirculation of air through the dryer and a heat pump to condense water out of the air. Reduced air flow rate and heater input leads to energy savings around 8%, while recirculation of exhaust air reduces the energy consumption by approximately 18%. Because of the low cost of these two measures, they should be pursued by the manufacturers. When utilizing an air-to-air heat exchanger for heat recovery, two modes are considered. The first is to preheat the inlet air with heat from the exhaust air, which results in 20 to 26% energy savings depending upon the location of the dryer in the house. The second more attractive mode is 100% recirculation of air and condensation of water from this air in the heat exchanger (using indoor air as a heat sink) and represents a 100% heat recovery but leads to a 1 to 6% increase in energy consumption. The development of a clothes dryer equipped with an air-to-air heat exchanger and a summer/winter switch (preheating mode in the summer and recirculation/condenstion mode in the winter) should be pursued by the manufacturers. Recirculation through a heat pump with condensation again gives a 100% heat recovery and can save up to 33% in energy consumption but yields long drying times due to limitations of the condenser temperature.

Physical Description

Pages: 79

Notes

NTIS, PC A05/MF A01.

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  • Other: DE84005861
  • Report No.: LBL-16813
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • DOI: 10.2172/5365096 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 5365096
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1068373

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • July 1, 1983

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Feb. 4, 2018, 10:51 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • March 29, 2018, 1 p.m.

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Hekmat, D. & Fisk, W.J. Improving the energy efficiency of residential clothes dryers, report, July 1, 1983; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1068373/: accessed April 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.