Annual emissions and air-quality impacts of an urban area district-heating system: Boston case study

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A district-heating system, based on thermal energy from power plants retrofitted to operate in the cogeneration mode, is expected to improve local air quality. This possibility has been examined by comparing the emissions of five major atmospheric pollutants, i.e., particulates, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides, from the existing heating and electric system in the City of Boston with those from a proposed district heating system. Detailed, spatial distribution of existing heating load and fuel mix is developed to specify emissions associated with existing heating systems. Actual electric-power-plant parameters and generation for the base year are specified. Additional ... continued below

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Pages: 106

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Bernow, S.S.; McAnulty, D.R.; Buchsbaum, S. & Levine, E. February 1, 1980.

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Description

A district-heating system, based on thermal energy from power plants retrofitted to operate in the cogeneration mode, is expected to improve local air quality. This possibility has been examined by comparing the emissions of five major atmospheric pollutants, i.e., particulates, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides, from the existing heating and electric system in the City of Boston with those from a proposed district heating system. Detailed, spatial distribution of existing heating load and fuel mix is developed to specify emissions associated with existing heating systems. Actual electric-power-plant parameters and generation for the base year are specified. Additional plant fuel consumption and emissions resulting from cogeneration operation have been estimated. Six alternative fuel-emissions-control scenarios are considered. The average annual ground-level concentrations of sulfur oxides are calculated using a modified form of the EPA's Climatological Dispersion Model. This report describes the methodology, the results and their implications, and the areas for extended investigation. The initial results confirm expectations. Average sulfur oxides concentrations at various points within and near the city drop by up to 85% in the existing fuels scenarios and by 95% in scenarios in which different fuels and more-stringent emissions controls at the plants are used. These reductions are relative to concentrations caused by fuel combustion for heating and large commercial and industrial process uses within the city and Boston Edison Co. electric generation.

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Pages: 106

Notes

NTIS, PC A06/MF A01.

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  • Report No.: ANL/CNSV-TM-36
  • Grant Number: W-31-109-ENG-38
  • DOI: 10.2172/5227005 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 5227005
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1064530

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • February 1, 1980

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Feb. 4, 2018, 10:51 a.m.

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  • April 17, 2018, 4:08 p.m.

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Bernow, S.S.; McAnulty, D.R.; Buchsbaum, S. & Levine, E. Annual emissions and air-quality impacts of an urban area district-heating system: Boston case study, report, February 1, 1980; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1064530/: accessed June 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.