Furyous Female Just-Warriors of Post-Apocalypse and Dystopia

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The intention of this thesis is to identify and analyze the precise shift from an exploitative archetype to an empowered representation of women warriors, to identify the arena in which male and female characters are given equal agency in the context of war, and finally explore the key characteristics that make up an empowered female hero. This thesis also addresses the sociocultural nature of the warrior woman archetype as it pertains to the current role of women in the military. The films analyzed in this thesis are all post 9/11 films; a fact that links them culturally to the wars ... continued below

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Lynch, Shaylynn December 2017.

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This thesis is part of the collection entitled: UNT Theses and Dissertations and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 56 times , with 12 in the last month . More information about this thesis can be viewed below.

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  • Lynch, Shaylynn

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Description

The intention of this thesis is to identify and analyze the precise shift from an exploitative archetype to an empowered representation of women warriors, to identify the arena in which male and female characters are given equal agency in the context of war, and finally explore the key characteristics that make up an empowered female hero. This thesis also addresses the sociocultural nature of the warrior woman archetype as it pertains to the current role of women in the military. The films analyzed in this thesis are all post 9/11 films; a fact that links them culturally to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In recent years, numerous milestones have been reached for women in the armed services, especially for those women in combat positions. For the first time in American history women are being recognized for their active role as soldiers in combat. Therefore, it is valid to consider the correlation between seeing women as military professionals, fighting alongside male soldiers in these films, and the cultural impact of female combat soldiers. This aspect of the thesis also imbues the female just-warrior archetype with a legitimate history, mythology, and current cultural reference; which is essential to the visibility of female combat soldiers of the 21st century.

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  • December 2017

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Jan. 27, 2018, 7:36 a.m.

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Lynch, Shaylynn. Furyous Female Just-Warriors of Post-Apocalypse and Dystopia, thesis, December 2017; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1062883/: accessed October 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .