Madrigal

One of 648 recordings in the series: MISAME available on this site.
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Description

Recording of Zoltán Pongrácz's Madrigal for tape. The aim of the composer was to create a madrigal, one of the most aristocratic of the choral genres of the Renaissance, through electronic means. He uses the characteristics of the Italian madrigal as an element of the musical color to create effects of the Gothic choral music. The raw material is based only on the recitation of the sonnet, as well as on sounds sung at various frequencies by the choir. Pongrácz also calls this work a concerto, but not in the traditional understanding of the genre, particularly in the case of ... continued below

Physical Description

1 sound recording (10 min., 10 sec.)

Creation Information

Pongrácz, Zoltán 1981.

Context

This audio recording is part of the collection entitled: Mnemothèque Internationale des Arts Electroacoustiques and was provided by UNT Music Library to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this recording can be viewed below.

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  • Main Title: Madrigal
  • Series Title: MISAME

Description

Recording of Zoltán Pongrácz's Madrigal for tape. The aim of the composer was to create a madrigal, one of the most aristocratic of the choral genres of the Renaissance, through electronic means. He uses the characteristics of the Italian madrigal as an element of the musical color to create effects of the Gothic choral music. The raw material is based only on the recitation of the sonnet, as well as on sounds sung at various frequencies by the choir. Pongrácz also calls this work a concerto, but not in the traditional understanding of the genre, particularly in the case of the conception and the formal structure; he calls it such because of the contrast between the cymbalum and the spectra of the oscillators. Madrigal was realized at the Studio for Electronic Music of the Hungarian Radio in Budapest.

Physical Description

1 sound recording (10 min., 10 sec.)

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Mnemothèque Internationale des Arts Electroacoustiques

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Creation Date

  • 1981

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Jan. 23, 2018, 8:59 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 5, 2018, 5:12 p.m.

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Pongrácz, Zoltán. Madrigal, audio recording, 1981; Bourges, France. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1062675/: accessed September 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Music Library.