The Philosopher and the Lecturer: John Dewey, Everett Dean Martin, and Reflective Thinking

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This article examines the connection between John Dewey and Everett Dean Martin and explains why Martin's views may have resonated with Dewey and how they shared critical values pertaining to adult education.

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20 p.

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Day, Michael & Harbour, Clifford P. June 24, 2013.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Education to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 21 times , with 7 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Purdue University
    Publisher Info: Published on behalf of the John Dewey Society
    Place of Publication: Lafayette, Indiana

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Description

This article examines the connection between John Dewey and Everett Dean Martin and explains why Martin's views may have resonated with Dewey and how they shared critical values pertaining to adult education.

Physical Description

20 p.

Notes

Abstract: Adult education scholars have not yet examined the connections between the philosopher, John Dewey, and the lecturer on adult education, Everett Dean Martin. These scholars generally portray Dewey as indifferent to their field. However, Dewey's correspondence with a New York newspaper editor in 1928, recommending Martin's The Meaning of Liberal Education, raises interesting questions about these two men and their interest both in the meaning of adult education and in reflective thinking. For Dewey and Martin the value of education engaged in by adults was not merely voluntary participation in an activity but meaningful growth aided by reflection. This study examines the connection between these two figures and explains why Martin's views may have resonated with Dewey and how they shared critical values pertaining to adult education.

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  • Education & Culture, 2013. Lafayette, IN: Purdue University

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  • Publication Title: Education & Culture
  • Volume: 29
  • Issue: 1
  • Pages: 105-124
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

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  • June 24, 2013

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Jan. 23, 2018, 5:28 a.m.

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Day, Michael & Harbour, Clifford P. The Philosopher and the Lecturer: John Dewey, Everett Dean Martin, and Reflective Thinking, article, June 24, 2013; Lafayette, Indiana. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1062092/: accessed July 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Education.