Neighborhood Effects on Food Consumption

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This article examines the dual role of the social and physical neighborhood environment as they relate to the eating behaviors of residents of a low-income minority urban neighborhood.

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41 p.

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Leonard, Tammy; McKillop, Caitlin; Carson, Jo Ann & Shuval, Kerem May 12, 2014.

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This article examines the dual role of the social and physical neighborhood environment as they relate to the eating behaviors of residents of a low-income minority urban neighborhood.

Physical Description

41 p.

Notes

Abstract: Food consumption behavior is likely a result of environmental stimuli, access, and personal
preferences, making policy aimed at increasing the nutritional content of food consumption
challenging. We examine the dual role of the social and physical neighborhood environment as
they relate to the eating behaviors of residents of a low-income minority urban neighborhood.
We find that both proximity to different types of food sources (a characteristic of the physical
neighborhood environment) and dietary intake of neighbors (a characteristic of the
neighborhood’s social environment) are related to dietary intake. The relationships are most
robust for fruits and vegetables consumption. Proximity to fast food sources is related to less
fruits and vegetables consumption while the opposite is found for individuals residing closer to
fresh food sources. Additionally, individuals whose neighbors report increased fruits and
vegetables intake also report higher fruits and vegetables consumption, while controlling for
proximity to food sources. Instrumental variable and quasi-experimental robustness checks
suggest that correlation in neighbors’ fruits and vegetables consumption is likely due to social
interactions among neighboring residents. The results elucidate important inter-relationships
between access and social norms that influence dietary behavior.

This is the accepted manuscript version of the article. Reprinted with permission from Elsevier Science Ltd., all rights reserved. The final definitive version is available here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socec.2014.04.002.

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  • Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, 51, Elsevier, May 12, 2014, pp. 1-41

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  • Publication Title: Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics
  • Volume: 51
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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  • May 12, 2014

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Jan. 23, 2018, 5:28 a.m.

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  • Dec. 5, 2023, 1:28 p.m.

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Leonard, Tammy; McKillop, Caitlin; Carson, Jo Ann & Shuval, Kerem. Neighborhood Effects on Food Consumption, article, May 12, 2014; Amsterdam, The Netherlands. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1062091/: accessed May 24, 2024), University of North Texas Libraries, UNT Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.

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