Heat pump augmented radiator for low-temperature space applications

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Closed-cycle, space-based heat rejection systems depend solely on radiation to achieve their heat dissipation function. Since the payload heat rejection temperature is typically 50 K above that of the radiation sink in near earth orbit, the size and mass of these systems can be appreciable. Size (and potentially mass) reductions are achievable by increasing the rejection temperature via a heat pump. Two heat pump concept were examined to determine if radiator area reductions could be realized without increasing the mass of the heat rejection system. The first was a conventional, electrically-driven vapor compression system. The second is an innovative concept ... continued below

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Pages: 20

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Olszewski, M. & Rockenfeller, U. January 1, 1988.

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Description

Closed-cycle, space-based heat rejection systems depend solely on radiation to achieve their heat dissipation function. Since the payload heat rejection temperature is typically 50 K above that of the radiation sink in near earth orbit, the size and mass of these systems can be appreciable. Size (and potentially mass) reductions are achievable by increasing the rejection temperature via a heat pump. Two heat pump concept were examined to determine if radiator area reductions could be realized without increasing the mass of the heat rejection system. The first was a conventional, electrically-driven vapor compression system. The second is an innovative concept using a solid-vapor adsorption system driven by reject heat from the prime power system. The mass and radiator area of the heat pumpradiator systems were compared to that of a radiator only system to determine the merit of the heat pump concepts. Results for the compressor system indicated that the mass minimum occured at a temperature lift of about 50 K and radiator area reductions of 35% were realized. With a radiator specific mass of 10 kgm/sup 2/, the heat pump system is 15% higher than the radiator only baseline system. The complex compound chemisorption systems showed more promising results. Using water vapor as the working fluid in a single stage heat amplifier resulted in optimal temperature lifts exceeding 150 K. This resulted in a radiator area reduction of 83% with a mass reduction of 64%. 7 refs., 9 figs.

Physical Description

Pages: 20

Notes

NTIS, PC A03/MF A01; 1.

Source

  • 23. intersociety energy conversion engineering conference, Denver, CO, USA, 31 Jul 1988

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  • Other: DE88008369
  • Report No.: CONF-880702-2
  • Grant Number: AC05-84OR21400
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 5012257
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1061840

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • January 1, 1988

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Jan. 22, 2018, 7:23 a.m.

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  • Feb. 1, 2018, 6:26 p.m.

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Olszewski, M. & Rockenfeller, U. Heat pump augmented radiator for low-temperature space applications, article, January 1, 1988; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1061840/: accessed October 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.