A 3-D dynamical/chemical GCM for simulating the anthropogenical effects on ozone

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In spite of the significantly increased attention atmospheric ozone has received over the last two decades or so, a fully quantitative understanding of the three-dimensional ozone structure remains unavailable. In the past, one-dimensional (vertical column) models have provided most of the quantitative simulations of atmospheric chemical systems, because these models can treat large ensembles of chemical process economically. More recently, two-dimensional (meridional cross section) models have become popular, in part because of increasing computer capabilities. There has been little work using a sophisticated 3-D GCM coupled with a comprehensive photochemical model to study the chemical-dynamical interactions involving the ozone abundance. ... continued below

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Pages: (6 p)

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Kao, C.Y.J.; Glatzmaier, G.A.; Malone, R.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)) & Turco, R.P. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA)) January 1, 1989.

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In spite of the significantly increased attention atmospheric ozone has received over the last two decades or so, a fully quantitative understanding of the three-dimensional ozone structure remains unavailable. In the past, one-dimensional (vertical column) models have provided most of the quantitative simulations of atmospheric chemical systems, because these models can treat large ensembles of chemical process economically. More recently, two-dimensional (meridional cross section) models have become popular, in part because of increasing computer capabilities. There has been little work using a sophisticated 3-D GCM coupled with a comprehensive photochemical model to study the chemical-dynamical interactions involving the ozone abundance. Namely, either the dynamics or the chemistry is too simplified in most of the existing models. Relatively more advanced photochemistry has been included in the stratospheric models (dealing the vertical domain from 20 to 70 km above the surface) at the expense of tropospheric details. An important motivation for this research has been the desire to estimate the magnitude of changes in the ozone layer induced by anthropogenic perturbations such as the injection of oxides of nitrogen and chlorine compounds. Accordingly, the attempt has been to develop a complete but feasible photochemical scheme and to combine it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) 3-D GCM. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

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Pages: (6 p)

Notes

NTIS, PC A02/MF A01 - OSTI; GPO Dep.

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  • 14. annual climate diagnostics workshop, San Diego, CA (USA), 16-20 Oct 1989

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  • Other: DE90004836
  • Report No.: LA-UR-89-4077
  • Report No.: CONF-8910338--1
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 5053661
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1057818

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  • January 1, 1989

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  • Jan. 22, 2018, 7:23 a.m.

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  • Feb. 1, 2018, 6:56 p.m.

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Kao, C.Y.J.; Glatzmaier, G.A.; Malone, R.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)) & Turco, R.P. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA)). A 3-D dynamical/chemical GCM for simulating the anthropogenical effects on ozone, article, January 1, 1989; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1057818/: accessed July 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.