Lessons from mother: Long-term impact of antibodies in breast milk on the gut microbiota and intestinal immune system of breastfed offspring

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This article summarizes recent data demonstrating that maternal antibodies in breast milk promote long-term intestinal homeostasis in suckling mice by regulating the gut microbiota and host gene expression.

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6 p.

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Rogier, Eric W.; Frantz, Aubrey L.; Bruno, Maria E.C.; Wedlund, Leia; Cohen, Donald A.; Stromberg, Arnold J. et al. October 30, 2014.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT Dallas to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 93 times , with 14 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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This article summarizes recent data demonstrating that maternal antibodies in breast milk promote long-term intestinal homeostasis in suckling mice by regulating the gut microbiota and host gene expression.

Physical Description

6 p.

Notes

Abstract: From birth to adulthood, the gut microbiota matures from a simple community dominated by a few major bacterial groups into a highly diverse ecosystem that provides both benefits and challenges to the host. Currently there is great interest in identifying environmental and host factors that shape the development of our gut microbiota. Breast milk is a rich source of maternal antibodies, which provide the first source of adaptive immunity in the newborn's intestinal tract. In this addendum, we summarize our recent data demonstrating that maternal antibodies in breast milk promote long-term intestinal homeostasis in suckling mice by regulating the gut microbiota and host gene expression. We also discuss important unanswered questions, future directions for research in this field, and implications for human health and disease.

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  • Gut Microbes, 2014. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis

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  • Publication Title: Gut Microbes
  • Volume: 5
  • Issue: 5
  • Pages: 663-668
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • May 20, 2014

Accepted Date

  • August 14, 2014

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  • October 30, 2014

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 14, 2017, 11:26 a.m.

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Rogier, Eric W.; Frantz, Aubrey L.; Bruno, Maria E.C.; Wedlund, Leia; Cohen, Donald A.; Stromberg, Arnold J. et al. Lessons from mother: Long-term impact of antibodies in breast milk on the gut microbiota and intestinal immune system of breastfed offspring, article, October 30, 2014; New York, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1049741/: accessed October 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Dallas.