Is There a General Motor Program for Right Versus Left Hand Throwing in Children?

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

This article discusses whether a general motor program controls some or all aspects of overhand throwing.

Physical Description

4 p.

Creation Information

Thomas, Jerry R.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; Thomas, Katherine; Campbell, Amity C.; Edwards, W. Brent & Elliott, Bruce C. August 29, 2011.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Education to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 41 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Publisher

Provided By

UNT College of Education

The UNT College of Education prepares professionals and scholars who contribute to the advancement of education, health, and human development. Programs in the college prepare teachers, leaders, physical activity and health specialists, educational researchers, recreational leaders, child development and family studies specialists, doctoral faculty, counselors, and special and gifted education teachers and leaders.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

This article discusses whether a general motor program controls some or all aspects of overhand throwing.

Physical Description

4 p.

Notes

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine if a general motor program controlled some or all aspects of overhand throwing. Using a 12 camera Vicon motion analysis system to record data from body markers, a group of 30 Australian Aboriginal children 6-10 years of age threw with maximal effort into a large target area. Data were reduced and analysed for numerous variables and correlations were calculated between dominant and non-dominant side variables that were deemed reliable. Results indicated that five variables showed significant dominant to non-dominant correlations. However, only two of the five were entered into both multiple regressions to predict horizontal ball velocity for the dominant vs. non-dominant sides. The variables entered suggested that more gross aspects of the movement (stride distance and pelvis flexion) were both correlated from dominant to non-dominant sides and predicted horizontal ball velocity. Thus, the general motor program does not appear to control the more complex and coordinated parts of the throwing motion.

Source

  • Journal of Biosensors & Bioelectronics, 2011. Los Angeles, CA: OMICS Publishing Group.

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Journal of Biosensors & Bioelectronics
  • Volume: S1
  • Pages: 1-4

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Submitted Date

  • August 10, 2011

Accepted Date

  • August 27, 2011

Creation Date

  • August 29, 2011

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 30, 2017, 9:17 a.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 2
Total Uses: 41

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Thomas, Jerry R.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; Thomas, Katherine; Campbell, Amity C.; Edwards, W. Brent & Elliott, Bruce C. Is There a General Motor Program for Right Versus Left Hand Throwing in Children?, article, August 29, 2011; Los Angeles, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1042603/: accessed November 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Education.