Breaking Health Insurance Knowledge Barriers Through Games: Pilot Test of Health Care America

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This article discusses the design and testing of an interactive newsgame about health insurance.

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13 p.

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Champlin, Sara & James, Juli November 16, 2017.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 19 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism

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Description

This article discusses the design and testing of an interactive newsgame about health insurance.

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13 p.

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ABSTRACT

Background: Having health insurance is associated with a number of beneficial health outcomes. However, previous research suggests that patients tend to avoid health insurance information and often misunderstand or lack knowledge about many health insurance terms. Health insurance knowledge is particularly low among young adults.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to design and test an interactive newsgame (newsgames are games that apply journalistic principles in their creation, for example, gathering stories to immerse the player in narratives) about health insurance. This game included entry-level information through scenarios and was designed through the collation of national news stories, local personal accounts, and health insurance company information.

Methods: A total of 72 (N=72) participants completed in-person, individual gaming sessions. Participants completed a survey before and after game play.

Results: Participants indicated a greater self-reported understanding of how to use health insurance from pre- (mean=3.38, SD=0.98) to postgame play (mean=3.76, SD=0.76); t71=−3.56, P=.001. For all health insurance terms, participants self-reported a greater understanding following game play. Finally, participants provided a greater number of correct definitions for terms after playing the game, (mean=3.91, SD=2.15) than they did before game play (mean=2.59, SD=1.68); t31=−3.61, P=.001. Significant differences from pre- to postgame play differed by health insurance term.

Conclusions: A game is a practical solution to a difficult health issue—the game can be played anywhere, including on a mobile device, is interactive and will thus engage an apathetic audience, and is cost-efficient in its execution.

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  • JMIR Serious Games, 2017. Toronto, ON: Journal of Medical Internet Research Publications

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  • Publication Title: JMIR Serious Games
  • Volume: 5
  • Issue: 4
  • Pages: 1-13
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

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  • April 3, 2017

Accepted Date

  • August 26, 2017

Creation Date

  • November 16, 2017

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 30, 2017, 9:17 a.m.

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Champlin, Sara & James, Juli. Breaking Health Insurance Knowledge Barriers Through Games: Pilot Test of Health Care America, article, November 16, 2017; Toronto, Ontario. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1042581/: accessed July 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism.