(Mis)Understanding Islam in a Suburban Texas School District

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This article reports a Texas suburban school district's efforts to promote cultural proficiency after leadership trainings.

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20 p.

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Ezzani, Miriam & Brooks, Melanie C. February 3, 2015.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by the UNT College of Education to the UNT Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 164 times. More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Miriam D. Ezzani and Melanie C. Brooks

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This article reports a Texas suburban school district's efforts to promote cultural proficiency after leadership trainings.

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20 p.

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Abstract: This case study reports one Texas suburban school district’s efforts to promote cultural proficiency after leadership trainings and explores how and in what ways this may or may not have improved school leaders’ understanding of Islam. Terrell and Lindsey’s (2009) conceptual framework of Leadership and the Cultural Proficiency Continuum guided the inquiry, which was comprised of constructs that span from culturally destructive to proficient. Data collection included semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, observations, and documents. The analysis of data revealed that the cultural proficiency trainings did and did not influence the cultural proficiency of educators working in the district.

This is the author manuscript version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in Religion & Education. Copyright 2015 Taylor & Francis. The final definitive version is available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15507394.2015.1013408

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  • Religion & Education, 2015. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis

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  • Publication Title: Religion & Education
  • Volume: 42
  • Pages: 18
  • Page Start: 237
  • Page End: 254
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • February 3, 2015

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  • Oct. 26, 2017, 3:36 p.m.

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  • Feb. 2, 2021, 2:59 p.m.

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Ezzani, Miriam & Brooks, Melanie C. (Mis)Understanding Islam in a Suburban Texas School District, article, February 3, 2015; New York, New York. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1036591/: accessed June 19, 2024), University of North Texas Libraries, UNT Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Education.

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