Democratic Twittering: Microblogging for a More Participatory Social Studies

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This article uses the example of the Arab Spring to discuss how new media lowers barriers so that more voices may be heard.

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4 p.

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Krutka, Daniel G. March 2014.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Education to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 27 times , with 9 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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Description

This article uses the example of the Arab Spring to discuss how new media lowers barriers so that more voices may be heard.

Physical Description

4 p.

Notes

Abstract: Waves of revolutionary actions beginning in late 2010 led to the downfall of dictatorial leaders who had been entrenched in the Arab world for decades. Everyday citizens used social media services to coordinate, communicate, expose, and respond to the oppressive forces that would crush pockets of resistance. In Egypt, the Facebook page “We are All Khaled Said” not only memorialized a man killed by an authoritarian police force, but provided a digital space for emotional outlet and, eventually, the coordination of rebellious activities.1 As public protests intensified on January 25, 2011, insurgents were able to synchronize collective action and publicize their cause through Twitter by using the hashtag #Jan25. The period known as the Arab Spring provides just one of many examples of how new media “have lowered the costs of production and circulation, decreasing the investment of skills and money required to meaningfully shape our culture, and thus have paved the way for more voices to be heard.”

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  • Social Education, 2014. Silver Spring, MD: National Council for the Social Studies

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  • Publication Title: Social Education
  • Volume: 78
  • Issue: 2
  • Pages: 86-89
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

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  • March 2014

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  • Oct. 14, 2017, 9:21 p.m.

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Krutka, Daniel G. Democratic Twittering: Microblogging for a More Participatory Social Studies, article, March 2014; Silver Spring, Maryland. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1020972/: accessed November 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Education.