Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management

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Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) co-exist in soil, but their relative distribution may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Effects of changes in soil organic matter and nutrient content on the AOB and AOA are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare effects of long-term soil organic matter depletion and amendments with labile (straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and without easily plant-available nitrogen, on the activities, abundances and community structures of AOB and AOA. Soil was sampled from a long-term field site in Sweden that was established in 1956. The potential ammonia oxidation rates, the ... continued below

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Wessen, E.; Nyberg, K.; Jansson, J.K. & Hallin, S. May 1, 2010.

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Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) co-exist in soil, but their relative distribution may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Effects of changes in soil organic matter and nutrient content on the AOB and AOA are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare effects of long-term soil organic matter depletion and amendments with labile (straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and without easily plant-available nitrogen, on the activities, abundances and community structures of AOB and AOA. Soil was sampled from a long-term field site in Sweden that was established in 1956. The potential ammonia oxidation rates, the AOB and AOA amoA gene abundances and the community structures of both groups based on T-RFLP of amoA genes were determined. Straw amendment during 50 years had not altered any of the measured soil parameters, while the addition of peat resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon as well as a decrease in pH. Nitrogen fertilization alone resulted in a small decrease in soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen, but an increase in primary production. Type and amount of organic matter had an impact on the AOB and AOA community structures and the AOA abundance. Our findings confirmed that AOA are abundant in soil, but showed that under certain conditions the AOB dominate, suggesting niche differentiation between the two groups at the field site. The large differences in potential rates between treatments correlated to the AOA community size, indicating that they were functionally more important in the nitrification process than the AOB. The AOA abundance was positively related to addition of labile organic carbon, which supports the idea that AOA could have alternative growth strategies using organic carbon. The AOB community size varied little in contrast to that of the AOA. This indicates that the bacterial ammonia oxidizers as a group have a greater ecophysiological diversity and potentially cover a broader range of habitats.

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  • Journal Name: Applied Soil Ecology; Journal Volume: 45; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2010

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  • Report No.: LBNL-3651E
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.apsoil.2010.04.003 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 989850
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1016098

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  • May 1, 2010

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  • Oct. 14, 2017, 8:36 a.m.

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  • Oct. 18, 2017, 10:36 a.m.

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Wessen, E.; Nyberg, K.; Jansson, J.K. & Hallin, S. Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management, article, May 1, 2010; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1016098/: accessed December 11, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.