Extracellular matrix control of mammary gland morphogenesis and tumorigenesis: insights from imaging

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The extracellular matrix (ECM), once thought to solely provide physical support to a tissue, is a key component of a cell's microenvironment responsible for directing cell fate and maintaining tissue specificity. It stands to reason, then, that changes in the ECM itself or in how signals from the ECM are presented to or interpreted by cells can disrupt tissue organization; the latter is a necessary step for malignant progression. In this review, we elaborate on this concept using the mammary gland as an example. We describe how the ECM directs mammary gland formation and function, and discuss how a cell's ... continued below

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Ghajar, Cyrus M & Bissell, Mina J October 23, 2008.

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Description

The extracellular matrix (ECM), once thought to solely provide physical support to a tissue, is a key component of a cell's microenvironment responsible for directing cell fate and maintaining tissue specificity. It stands to reason, then, that changes in the ECM itself or in how signals from the ECM are presented to or interpreted by cells can disrupt tissue organization; the latter is a necessary step for malignant progression. In this review, we elaborate on this concept using the mammary gland as an example. We describe how the ECM directs mammary gland formation and function, and discuss how a cell's inability to interpret these signals - whether as a result of genetic insults or physicochemical alterations in the ECM - disorganizes the gland and promotes malignancy. By restoring context and forcing cells to properly interpret these native signals, aberrant behavior can be quelled and organization re-established. Traditional imaging approaches have been a key complement to the standard biochemical, molecular, and cell biology approaches used in these studies. Utilizing imaging modalities with enhanced spatial resolution in live tissues may uncover additional means by which the ECM regulates tissue structure, on different length scales, through its pericellular organization (short-scale) and by biasing morphogenic and morphostatic gradients (long-scale).

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1105

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  • Journal Name: Histochemistry and Cell Biology; Journal Volume: 130; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 12/2008

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  • Report No.: LBNL-3952E
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • DOI: 10.1007/s00418-008-0537-1 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 989219
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1015751

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • October 23, 2008

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  • Oct. 14, 2017, 8:36 a.m.

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  • Oct. 17, 2017, 6:11 p.m.

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Ghajar, Cyrus M & Bissell, Mina J. Extracellular matrix control of mammary gland morphogenesis and tumorigenesis: insights from imaging, article, October 23, 2008; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1015751/: accessed April 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.