Short-term antibiotic treatment has differing long-term impacts on the human throat and gut microbiome

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Antibiotic administration is the standard treatment for the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, the main causative agent of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, the long-term consequences of this treatment on the human indigenous microbiota are relatively unexplored. Here we studied short- and long-term effects of clarithromycin and metronidazole treatment, a commonly used therapy regimen against H. pylori, on the indigenous microbiota in the throat and in the lower intestine. The bacterial compositions in samples collected over a four year period were monitored by analyzing the 16S rRNA gene using 454-based pyrosequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). While the microbial ... continued below

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Jakobsson, H.; Jernberg, C.; Andersson, A.F.; Sjolund-Karlsson, M.; Jansson, J.K. & Engstrand, L. January 15, 2010.

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Antibiotic administration is the standard treatment for the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, the main causative agent of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, the long-term consequences of this treatment on the human indigenous microbiota are relatively unexplored. Here we studied short- and long-term effects of clarithromycin and metronidazole treatment, a commonly used therapy regimen against H. pylori, on the indigenous microbiota in the throat and in the lower intestine. The bacterial compositions in samples collected over a four year period were monitored by analyzing the 16S rRNA gene using 454-based pyrosequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). While the microbial communities of untreated control subjects were relatively stable over time, dramatic shifts were observed one week after antibiotic treatment with reduced bacterial diversity in all treated subjects in both locations. While the microbiota of the different subjects responded uniquely to the antibiotic treatment some general trends could be observed; such as a dramatic decline in Actinobacteria in both throat and feces immediately after treatment. Although the diversity of the microbiota subsequently recovered to resemble the pre treatment states, the microbiota remained perturbed in some cases for up to four years post treatment. In addition, four years after treatment high levels of the macrolide resistance gene erm(B) were found, indicating that antibiotic resistance, once selected for, can persist for longer periods of time than previously recognized. This highlights the importance of a restrictive antibiotic usage in order to prevent subsequent treatment failure and potential spread of antibiotic resistance.

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  • Journal Name: PLoS One; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2010

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  • Report No.: LBNL-3132E
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009836 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 982932
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1015695

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • January 15, 2010

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  • Oct. 14, 2017, 8:36 a.m.

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  • Oct. 18, 2017, 10:11 a.m.

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Jakobsson, H.; Jernberg, C.; Andersson, A.F.; Sjolund-Karlsson, M.; Jansson, J.K. & Engstrand, L. Short-term antibiotic treatment has differing long-term impacts on the human throat and gut microbiome, article, January 15, 2010; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1015695/: accessed October 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.