Utility Monitoring for the Antiproton Source

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Description

The purpose of the utility portion of the FIRUS system is to alert humans in the main control room, at Phillips farm, and in building 10 control room when either environmental conditions are unhealthy for antiproton source devices, or electrical or mechanical equipment is malfunctioning. When first envisioned, the FIRUS system consisted of the following equipment: (1) 2 FIRUS mini-computers (wall mounted, 1 fire, 1 utility); (2) emergency power supply (also wall mounted); (3) coax hardline communication cable; (4) Junction boxes; (5) contact points and analog transducers; (6) three-pair 18 gage shielded cable; and (7) silent printer. Each mini can ... continued below

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11 pages

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McConnell, D. June 11, 1984.

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Description

The purpose of the utility portion of the FIRUS system is to alert humans in the main control room, at Phillips farm, and in building 10 control room when either environmental conditions are unhealthy for antiproton source devices, or electrical or mechanical equipment is malfunctioning. When first envisioned, the FIRUS system consisted of the following equipment: (1) 2 FIRUS mini-computers (wall mounted, 1 fire, 1 utility); (2) emergency power supply (also wall mounted); (3) coax hardline communication cable; (4) Junction boxes; (5) contact points and analog transducers; (6) three-pair 18 gage shielded cable; and (7) silent printer. Each mini can monitor 16 contact points or 15 analog points or a combination of contact and analog points. Each contact point can be more than one physical point if the points are wired in series. An alarm then indicates anyone of a group of points has opened. The following devices/quantities are proposed to be monitored by the utility portion of the FIRUS system: (1) sump pumps; (2) LCW (Low Conductivity Water); (3) auxiliary generator; (4) service building temperatures; (5) stub room/tunnel temperature; and (6) stub room/tunnel humidity. After the number of quantities to be monitored (see table I) was determined, it was found that two or three minis would be required, or a FIRUS crate could be used. A FIRUS crate is an 'old beam transfer crate' with 25 slots which hold cards to either monitor 16 contact points or 15 analog points. The space requirement for the crate system is about half a relay rack. The emergency power supply could remain wall mounted, or it could be rack mounted with the firus crate. Conversations with Al Franck and Rich Mahler concerning availability, expandability, cabling, and cost indicate that the FIRUS crate is the preperable option for the antiproton source.

Physical Description

11 pages

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  • Report No.: FERMILAB-PBAR-NOTE-394
  • Grant Number: AC02-07CH11359
  • DOI: 10.2172/983368 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 983368
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1015073

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • June 11, 1984

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 14, 2017, 8:36 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Oct. 25, 2017, 4:07 p.m.

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McConnell, D. Utility Monitoring for the Antiproton Source, report, June 11, 1984; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1015073/: accessed April 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.