CELL SHAPE AND HEXOSE TRANSPORT IN NORMAL AND VIRUS-TRANSFORMED CELLS IN CULTURE

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The rate of hexose transport was compared in normal and virus-transformed cells on a monolayer and in suspension. It was shown that: (1) Both trypsin-removed cells and those suspended for an additional day in methyl cellulose had decreased rates of transport and lower available water space when compared with cells on a monolayer. Thus, cell shape affects the overall rate of hexose transport, especially at higher sugar concentrations. (2) Even in suspension, the initial transport rates remained higher in transformed cells with reference to normal cells. Scanning electron micrographs of normal and transformed chick cells revealed morphological differences only in ... continued below

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26 p.

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Bissell, M.J.; Farson, D. & Tung, A.S.C. July 1, 1976.

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The rate of hexose transport was compared in normal and virus-transformed cells on a monolayer and in suspension. It was shown that: (1) Both trypsin-removed cells and those suspended for an additional day in methyl cellulose had decreased rates of transport and lower available water space when compared with cells on a monolayer. Thus, cell shape affects the overall rate of hexose transport, especially at higher sugar concentrations. (2) Even in suspension, the initial transport rates remained higher in transformed cells with reference to normal cells. Scanning electron micrographs of normal and transformed chick cells revealed morphological differences only in the flat state. This indicates that the increased rate of hexose transport after transformation is not due to a difference in the shape of these cells on a monolayer. The relation between the geometry of cells, transport rates, and growth regulation is undoubtedly very complex, and our knowledge of these relationships is still very elementary. In a recent review on the influence of geometry on control of cell growth, Folkman and Greenspan (1) pointed out that the permeability of cells in a flat versus a spherical state may indeed be very different. The growth properties of cells on a surface and in suspension have been compared often (1-5). However, with one exception. little is known about the changes in transport properties when cell shape is changed. Foster and Pardee (6) demonstrated that the active transport of a-aminoisobutyric acid was reduced 2.5 times in suspension cultures of Chinese hamster cells with respect to the cells grown on a coverslip. They attributed this to the smaller surface area of suspended cells. While it is not clear why active transport should be dependent on the surface area available, it is possible that once the cells assume a spherical configuration, the carrier proteins are redistributed in such a way as to make them less accessible to the substrate. What happens to facilitated and nonmediated diffusion when cells are placed in suspension has not been determined. The transport of hexoses into animal cells in culture has been shown to occur by facilitated diffusion (7). In chick embryo fibroblasts in culture, there is more than one component to this transport system: a saturable carrier-mediated transport with a Km for 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) of about 1-5 mM (8-1 1) and a nonsaturable component which may include a low affinity transport site and/or nonmediated diffusion (8, 10, 11). It was shown previously (1 1) that growth rate, cell density, glucose deprivation, and virus transformation may alter not only the overall transport rate but also the rate of transport of one mode relative to the other. The rate of the nonmediated uptake, at least, is dependent upon the surface area available, and in addition total level of transport is dependent on the available water space (which in turn is roughly related to cell volume). Since it is estimated that the surface area may change as much as tenfold when cells go from a flat configuration to a spherical one (I), it is apparent that the cell shape could play a role in overall transport characteristics of cultured cells. Using glucose analogues, 2DG and 3-0-methylglucose (3MG), we compared the transport properties of normal and virus-transformed cells in suspension and on monolayers. It was found that both the rates as well as the total levels of transport were decreased after the cells were placed in suspension, with the nonsaturable component being most affected. Nevertheless, a difference in the initial rates of transport between normal and transformed cells remained, indicating that the difference is independent of cell shape.

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26 p.

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  • Journal Name: Journal of Supramolecular Structure; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 1977

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  • Report No.: LBL-5332
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 993760
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1015052

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  • July 1, 1976

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  • Oct. 14, 2017, 8:36 a.m.

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  • Oct. 17, 2017, 6:03 p.m.

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Bissell, M.J.; Farson, D. & Tung, A.S.C. CELL SHAPE AND HEXOSE TRANSPORT IN NORMAL AND VIRUS-TRANSFORMED CELLS IN CULTURE, article, July 1, 1976; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1015052/: accessed September 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.