HEAVY ION FUSION SCIENCE VIRTUAL NATIONAL LABORATORY2nd QUARTER 2010 MILESTONE REPORTDevelop the theory connecting pyrometer and streak camera spectrometer data to the material properties of beam heatedtargets and compare to the data

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This milestone has been accomplished. We have extended the theory that connects pyrometer and streak spectrometer data to material temperature on several fronts and have compared theory to NDCX-I experiments. For the case of NDCX-I, the data suggests that as the metallic foils are heated they break into droplets (cf. HIFS VNL Milestone Report FY 2009 Q4). Evaporation of the metallic surface will occur, but optical emission should be directly observable from the solid or liquid surface of the foil or from droplets. However, the emissivity of hot material may be changed from the cold material and interference effects will ... continued below

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More, R.M.; Barnard, J. J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M. & Ni, P. A. April 1, 2010.

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This milestone has been accomplished. We have extended the theory that connects pyrometer and streak spectrometer data to material temperature on several fronts and have compared theory to NDCX-I experiments. For the case of NDCX-I, the data suggests that as the metallic foils are heated they break into droplets (cf. HIFS VNL Milestone Report FY 2009 Q4). Evaporation of the metallic surface will occur, but optical emission should be directly observable from the solid or liquid surface of the foil or from droplets. However, the emissivity of hot material may be changed from the cold material and interference effects will alter the spectrum emitted from small droplets. These effects have been incorporated into a theory of emission from droplets. We have measured emission using streaked spectrometry and together with theory of emission from heated droplets have inferred the temperature of a gold foil heated by the NDCX-I experiment. The intensity measured by the spectrometer is proportional to the emissivity times the blackbody intensity at the temperature of the foil or droplets. Traditionally, a functional form for the emissivity as a function of wavelength (such as a quadratic) is assumed and the three unknown emissivity parameters (for the case of a quadratic) and the temperature are obtained by minimizing the deviations from the fit. In the case of the NDCX-I experiment, two minima were obtained: at 7200 K and 2400 K. The best fit was at 7200 K. However, when the actual measured emissivity of gold was used and when the theoretical corrections for droplet interference effects were made for emission from droplets having radii in the range 0.2 to 2.0 microns, the corrected emissivity was consistent with the 2400 K value, whereas the fit emissivity at 7200 K shows no similarity to the corrected emissivity curves. Further, an estimate of the temperature obtained from beam heating is consistent with the lower value. This exercise proved to be a warning to be skeptical of assuming functional forms when they are unknown, and also represents a first success of the droplet emission theory. The thermal optical emission from a hot metal surface is polarized (for observation angles that are not normal to the surface). By observing the intensity of both polarizations at two or more observation angles the emissivity can be inferred directly, and the temperature at the surface unambiguously determined. Emission from the spolarization (where the E-field is parallel to the surface and normal to the wave vector) is generally less intense than emission from the p-polarization (E-field that is normal to the s-polarization E-field and the wave vector.) The emissivity and temperature may be inferred directly without assuming any specific functional form for the emissivity or resorting to published data tables (which usually do not apply when temperatures reach the WDM regime). We have derived the theory of polarized emission from hot metals, and consider an improved method of temperature determination that takes advantage of polarization measurements, which we call polarization pyrometry. Thus far we have successfully applied the theory to electrically heated metallic filaments, and will apply the theory to beam heated targets when chamber space constraints are removed that will make it feasible to observe the targets at multiple angles. For the case of experiments on NDCX-II, hydrodynamic expansion on a nanosecond timescale that is comparable to the heating time will result in an expanding fluid, with a strong (but finite) density and temperature gradient. Emission will be observed from positions in the foil near the critical density (where the observation photon frequency is equal to the local plasma frequency). By assuming a brightness temperature equal to the local fluid temperature at the critical frequency, a time history of the emission spectrum from an expanding foil can be synthesized from a hydrodynamic simulation of the target. We find that observations from the ultraviolet to the infrared will allow a probing of the target at different depths, and will allow a test of specific equations of state. Improved versions of this theory that integrate the electric field along a ray from the interior of the metal to observation point are being constructed to give a more accurate description of the emitted spectrum.

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  • Report No.: LBNL-3281E
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • DOI: 10.2172/983163 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 983163
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1014498

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  • April 1, 2010

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  • Oct. 14, 2017, 8:36 a.m.

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More, R.M.; Barnard, J. J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M. & Ni, P. A. HEAVY ION FUSION SCIENCE VIRTUAL NATIONAL LABORATORY2nd QUARTER 2010 MILESTONE REPORTDevelop the theory connecting pyrometer and streak camera spectrometer data to the material properties of beam heatedtargets and compare to the data, report, April 1, 2010; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1014498/: accessed October 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.